Nav: Home

Finally available in a bottle

February 07, 2019

Since the discovery of the first homoleptic metal carbonyl complex Ni(CO)4 more than 130 years ago, scientists try to obtain further such compounds formed from a carbon monoxide molecule and a metal that are important for basic research as well as applications. The last new compound of this type to be bottled, the Co(CO)5 cation, was reported in 2003. However, extensive research in the gas phase has shown that far more metal carbonyl complexes than those known to date should exist, including the chromium hexacarbonyl cation. A team led by the chemists Prof. Dr. Ingo Krossing from the University of Freiburg and Prof. Dr. Frank Breher from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology were able to prepare this compound in common solvents and fill it into a bottle as a stable compound in crystalline form. They present their results in the journal Nature Communications.

"For over fifty years, researchers have been trying to prepare this highly studied and dynamic floppy molecule as a substance that can be bottled," explains Krossing. The research groups from Freiburg and Karlsruhe produced a combination of a strong oxidizing agent [NO]+ and a weakly coordinating anion, which enables the oxidation of Cr(CO)6, chromium hexacarbonyl, and isolated its room temperature stable radical salt. Normally [NO]+ leads to a coordination of the released nitrogen monoxide, but the researchers were able to suppress this with suitable reaction conditions. In the end, they succeeded in filling the stable compound, which, as found in the experiments, has several isomeric structures close in energy, into bottles as a solution and as crystals.

"Since we have used standard laboratory equipment and Schlenk techniques as well as common solvents for our method," said the professor from Freiburg, "it can now be used in all chemical laboratories and can therefore be used for a wider range of applications.
-end-
Original publication: Bohnenberger, J., Feuerstein, W., Himmel, D., Daub, M., Breher, F., Krossing, I. (2019): Stable salts of the hexacarbonyl chromium(I) cation and its pentacarbonyl-nitrosyl chromium(I) analogue. In: Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-08517-2.

Contact: Prof. Dr. Ingo Krossing
Institute for Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry
University of Freiburg
Tel.: 0761/203-6122
ingo.krossing@ac.uni-freiburg.de

University of Freiburg

Related Chromium Articles:

Co-occurring contaminants may increase NC groundwater risks
Eighty-four percent of the wells sampled in the Kings Mountain Belt and the Charlotte and Milton Belts of the Piedmont region of North Carolina contained concentrations of vanadium and hexavalent chromium that exceeded health recommendations from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services.
Half of Piedmont drinking wells may exceed NC's hexavalent chromium standards
A new study which combines measurements from nearly 1,400 drinking water wells across North Carolina estimates that more than half of the wells in the state's Piedmont region contain levels of cancer-causing hexavalent chromium in excess of state safety standards.
The first Cr-based nitrides superconductor Pr3Cr10-xN11
New novel Cr-based nitride superconductor is discovered in cubic nitrides Pr3Cr10-xN11 at 5.25 K.
Pressure may be key to fighting climate change with thermoelectric generators
Pressure improves the ability of materials to turn heat into electricity and could potentially be used to create clean generators, according to new work from a team that includes Carnegie's Alexander Goncharov and Viktor Struzhkin published in Nature Materials.
Harmful metals found in vapors from tank-style electronic cigarettes
A team of scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found the concentration of metals in electronic cigarette aerosols -- or vapor -- has increased since tank-style electronic cigarettes were introduced in 2013.
Metal particles abraded from tattooing needles travel inside the body
Allergic reactions are common side effects of tattoos and pigments have been blamed for this.
Toxic substances found in the glass and decoration of alcoholic beverage bottles
New research by the University of Plymouth shows that bottles of beer, wine and spirits contain potentially harmful levels of toxic elements, such as lead and cadmium, in their enamelled decorations.
Chemical juggling with three particles
Chemists from the University of Bonn and their US colleagues at Columbia University in New York have discovered a novel mechanism in catalysis.
Metals influence C-peptide hormone related to insulin
Metals such as zinc, copper and chromium bind to and influence a peptide involved in insulin production, according to new work from chemists at UC Davis.
Unprecedented insight into two-dimensional magnets using diamond quantum sensors
For the first time, physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in measuring the magnetic properties of atomically thin van der Waals materials on the nanoscale.
More Chromium News and Chromium Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Space
One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren't. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60's, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.