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What is white chocolate? (video)

February 07, 2019

WASHINGTON, Feb. 7, 2019 -- Today, we're showing our love for white chocolate. Sure, it lacks the rich flavor of milk chocolate and the glossy brown color of dark chocolate. And many people even argue it's not really chocolate at all. But in this Reactions video, we show you all there is to love about this creamy pale confection: https://youtu.be/4qI8qbfTkys.
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Reactions is a video series produced by the American Chemical Society and PBS Digital Studios. Subscribe to Reactions at http://bit.ly/ACSReactions, and follow us on Twitter @ACSreactions.

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