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Emerging therapies show benefit to patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis

February 07, 2019

Las Vegas, NV (Feb. 7, 2019) -- It is estimated that 3 million Americans live with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Currently, there are no cures for these diseases.

Studies being presented at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress -- a partnership of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation and the American Gastroenterological Association, in Las Vegas, NV, from Feb. 7-9 -- highlight advancements in treatments for patients with IBD.

JAK inhibitors continue to expand their reach in ulcerative colitis

Study Title: The Gut Selective, Orally Administered, PAN-JAK Inhibitor TD-1473 Demonstrates Favorable Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetic, and Signal for Clinical Activity in Subjects with Moderately-to-Severely Active Ulcerative Colitis

W.J Sandborn, University of California San Diego, et al.

Significance: There is a need for effective and safe oral therapeutic options for moderate to severe ulcerative colitis. Oral JAK inhibitors have potential for systemic immunosuppression. PAN-JAK Inhibitor TD-1473 has been designed as a broad inhibitor of the JAK pathway, but with the potential advantage in ulcerative colitis of having a largely topical effect, demonstrating an early signal of efficacy in moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis.

Biologic therapy targeting immune cell trafficking to the intestine is effective

Significance: IBD patients already benefit from therapy with vedolizumab. Several studies presented at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress highlight other biologics also showing promise for treatment of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

* Etrolizumab Treatment Modulates Soluable MAdCAM-1 Levels in Serum in Patients with Crohn's Disease
o J. McBride, Genentech Inc., South San Francisco, California, et al.

* Long-term Safety and Efficacy of the Anti-mucosal Addressin Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (MADCAM-1) Antibody SHP647 in Ulcerative Colitis: An Open-label Extension Study (TURANDOT II)
o W.J. Sandborn, University of California San Diego, et al.

* Long-term Safety, Efficacy and Pharmacokinetics of the Anti-mucosal Addressin Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (MADCAM-1) Monoclonal Antibody SHP647 in Crohn's Disease: The OPERA II Study
o W.J. Sandborn, University of California San Diego, et al.

All abstracts accepted to the Crohn's & Colitis Congress will be published in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases® (the official journal of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation) and Gastroenterology (the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association) on Feb. 7.

Attribution to the Crohn's & Colitis Congress® is requested in all coverage.
-end-
About the Crohn's & Colitis Congress®

The Crohn's & Colitis Congress®, taking place Feb. 7-9, 2019, in Las Vegas, combines the strengths of the nation's leading IBD patient organization, Crohn's & Colitis Foundation, and the premier GI professional association, American Gastroenterological Association (AGA). Together we are committed to convening the greatest minds in IBD to transform patient care. The Crohn's & Colitis Congress is the must-attend meeting for all IBD professionals. Learn more at http://crohnscolitiscongress.org.

About the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation

The Crohn's & Colitis Foundation is the largest non-profit, voluntary, health organization dedicated to finding cures for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The Foundation's mission is to cure Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and to improve the quality of life of children and adults who are affected by these diseases. The Foundation works to fulfill its mission by funding research; providing educational resources for patients and their families, medical professionals, and the public; and furnishing supportive services for those afflicted with IBD. For more information visit http://www.crohnscolitisfoundation.org, call 888-694-8872, or email info@crohnscolitisfoundation.org.

About the AGA Institute

The American Gastroenterological Association is the trusted voice of the GI community. Founded in 1897, the AGA has grown to more than 16,000 members from around the globe who are involved in all aspects of the science, practice and advancement of gastroenterology. The AGA Institute administers the practice, research and educational programs of the organization. http://www.gastro.org. Like AGA on Facebook . Follow us on Twitter @AmerGastroAssn. Check out our videos on YouTube. Join AGA on LinkedIn.

American Gastroenterological Association

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