Nav: Home

The protective role of dengue immunity on Zika infection in a Brazilian favela

February 07, 2019

By monitoring the spread of Zika virus through a densely populated Brazilian favela during a 2015 outbreak, researchers have gained new perspectives into the outbreaks of this virus in the Americas in recent years. The results highlight the protective effect of prior immunity to dengue virus. Because many Zika virus (ZIKV) infections are asymptomatic and non-specific in their clinical presentation, the infection dynamics of the virus have been difficult to characterize. One key unknown, the subject of numerous studies, is the role of pre-existing immunity to dengue virus (DENV), an endemic pathogen that shares many similarities to ZIKV. While DENV immunity has been hypothesized to influence both susceptibility to and resistance of ZIKV infection, neither trajectory has been rigorously evaluated in human populations. Leveraging a long-term health study in Salvador, Brazil -- the epicenter of a 2015 ZIKV outbreak -- Isabel Rodriguez-Barraquer and colleagues were able to characterize the transmission of the virus within an urban favela community. Rodriguez-Barraquer et al. used multiple serological assays, collected before and after the 2015 outbreak. They revealed that, of the 1,435 community residents tested, nearly 73% were infected by ZIKV during the epidemic. The presence of pre-existing DENV antibodies was associated with less risk of ZIKV infection and also of fewer experienced symptoms among those infected with ZIKV. Rodriguez-Barraquer et al. emphasize the highly spatial nature of ZIKV attack rates, which could indicate pockets of susceptible individuals that could sustain virus transmission after an apparent end to an epidemic. According to the authors, these groups may represent an opportunity for vaccine trials, to truly and effectively resolve the epidemic in populations that appear to have high immunity.
-end-


American Association for the Advancement of Science

Related Dengue Virus Articles:

Mosquitoes engineered to repel dengue virus
An international team of scientists has synthetically engineered mosquitoes that halt the transmission of the dengue virus.
Engineered mosquitoes cannot be infected with or transmit any dengue virus
Genetically engineered mosquitoes are resistant to multiple types of dengue virus (DENV), according to a study published Jan.
Breakthrough on curbing dengue
Scientists from Australia's national science agency, CSIRO, and the University of California San Diego have engineered the first breed of genetically modified mosquitoes resistant to spreading all four types of the dengue virus.
Structurally designed DNA star creates ultra-sensitive test for dengue virus
By folding snippets of DNA into the shape of a five-pointed star using structural DNA nanotechnology, researchers have created a trap that captures Dengue virus as it floats in the bloodstream.
Trials promise good news for countries with dengue and Zika virus
Scientists from the University of Melbourne and Glasgow and the Institute for Medical Research in Malaysia have found an effective and environmentally sustainable way to block the transmission of mosquito-borne dengue virus, in trials carried out in Malaysia.
Dengue virus becoming resistant to vaccines and therapeutics due to mutations in specific protein
Researchers from Duke-NUS Medical School, in collaboration with the Agency for Science, Technology and Research's Bioinformatics Institute, and the University of Texas Medical Branch, USA, have discovered that the dengue virus changes its shape through mutations in Envelope protein to evade vaccines and therapeutics.
Prior Zika virus or dengue virus infection does not affect secondary infections in monkeys
Previous infection with either Zika virus or dengue virus has no apparent effect on the clinical course of subsequent infection with the other virus, according to a study published August 1 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by David O'Connor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and colleagues.
Early dengue virus infection could "defuse" zika virus
The Zika virus outbreak in Latin America has affected over 60 million people up to now.
Dengue mosquito is Queensland's biggest threat for spreading Zika virus
Researchers in Australia at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute have found that the dengue fever mosquito common to north and central Queensland poses the greatest danger of spreading the Zika virus in Australia.
Dengue virus infection may cause severe outcomes following Zika virus infection during pregnancy
This study is the first to report a possible mechanism for the enhancement of Zika virus progression during pregnancy in an animal model.
More Dengue Virus News and Dengue Virus Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 3: Shared Immunity
More than a million people have caught Covid-19, and tens of thousands have died. But thousands more have survived and recovered. A week or so ago (aka, what feels like ten years in corona time) producer Molly Webster learned that many of those survivors possess a kind of superpower: antibodies trained to fight the virus. Not only that, they might be able to pass this power on to the people who are sick with corona, and still in the fight. Today we have the story of an experimental treatment that's popping up all over the country: convalescent plasma transfusion, a century-old procedure that some say may become one of our best weapons against this devastating, new disease.   If you have recovered from Covid-19 and want to donate plasma, national and local donation registries are gearing up to collect blood.  To sign up with the American Red Cross, a national organization that works in local communities, head here.  To find out more about the The National COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Project, which we spoke about in our episode, including information on clinical trials or plasma donation projects in your community, go here.  And if you are in the greater New York City area, and want to donate convalescent plasma, head over to the New York Blood Center to sign up. Or, register with specific NYC hospitals here.   If you are sick with Covid-19, and are interested in participating in a clinical trial, or are looking for a plasma donor match, check in with your local hospital, university, or blood center for more; you can also find more information on trials at The National COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Project. And lastly, Tatiana Prowell's tweet that tipped us off is here. This episode was reported by Molly Webster and produced by Pat Walters. Special thanks to Drs. Evan Bloch and Tim Byun, as well as the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.