Russian scientists propose a technology reducing the cost of high-efficiency solar cells

February 07, 2020

A group of St. Petersburg scientists has proposed and experimentally tested a technology for the fabrication of high-efficiency solar cells based on A3B5 semiconductors integrated on a silicon substrate, which in the future may increase the efficiency of the existing single-junction photovoltaic converters by 1.5 times. The development of the technology was forecasted by the Nobel Laureate Zhores Alferov. The results have been published in the journal Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells.

Today, with the rapid exhaustion of hydrocarbon fuel reserves and a growing concern about environmental issues, scientists are paying more and more attention to the development of the so-called "green technologies". One of the most popular topics in the field is the development of solar energy technologies.

However, wider use of the solar panels is hindered by a number of factors. Conventional silicon solar cells have a relatively low efficiency - less than 20%. More efficient technologies require much more complex semiconductor technologies, which significantly increases the price of the solar cells.

The St. Petersburg scientists have proposed a solution to this problem. The researchers from ITMO University, St. Petersburg Academic University and the Ioffe Institute showed that A3B5 structures could be grown on inexpensive silicon substrate, providing decrease in the price of multi-junction solar cells.

"Our work focuses on the development of efficient solar cells based on A3B5 materials integrated on silicon-substrate," comments Ivan Mukhin, an ITMO University researcher, head of a laboratory at Academic University and a co-author of the study. "The main difficulty in the epitaxial synthesis on silicon-substrate is that the deposited semiconductor must have the same crystal lattice parameter as silicon. Roughly speaking, the atoms of this material should be at the same distance from each other as are the silicon atoms. Unfortunately, there are few semiconductors that meet this requirement - one example is gallium phosphide (GaP). However, it's not very suitable for the fabrication of the solar cells since it has poor sunlight-absorbing property. But if we take GaP and add nitrogen (N), we obtain a solution of GaPN. Even at low N concentrations, this material demonstrates the direct-band property and is great at absorbing light, as well as having the capability to be integrated onto a silicon substrate. At the same time, silicon doesn't just serve as the building material for the photovoltaic layers - it itself can act as one of the photoactive layers of a solar cell, absorbing light in the infrared range. Zhores Alferov was one of the first to voice the idea of combining ASB5 structures and silicon."

Working at the laboratory, the scientists were able to obtain the top layer of the solar cell, integrated onto a silicon substrate. With increase of the photoactive layers number the efficiency of the solar cell grows, as each layer absorbs its part of the solar spectrum.

As of now, the researchers have developed the first small prototype of a solar cell based on the A3B5 on silicon-substrate . Now they are working on the development of the solar cell that would consist of several photoactive layers. Such solar cells will be significantly more effective at absorbing sunlight and generating electricity.

"We've learned to grow the topmost layer. This material system can potentially also be used for intermediate layers. If you add arsenic, you obtain quaternary GaPNAs alloy, and from it several junctions operating in different parts of the solar spectrum can be grown on a silicon substrate. As demonstrated in our previous work, the potential efficiency of such solar cells can exceed 40% under light concentration, which is 1.5 times higher than that of modern Si technologies," concludes Ivan Mukhin.
-end-
Reference: Liliia N.Dvoretckaia, Alexey D.Bolshakov, Alexey M.Mozharov, Maxim S.Sobolev, Demid A.Kirilenko, Artem I.Baranov, Vladimir Mikhailovskii, Vladimir V.Neplokh, Ivan A.Morozov, Vladimir V.Fedorov, Ivan S.Mukhin, "GaNP-based photovoltaic device integrated on Si substrate", Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 2020

ITMO University (St. Petersburg) is a national research university and Russia's number-one higher education institution in the field of information and photonic technologies. The university is a leader of Project 5-100, the Russian academic excellence program.

ITMO is the alma mater of winners of numerous international programming competitions such as ICPC (ITMO's team is the world's one and only seven-time ICPC champion), Google Code Jam, Facebook Hacker Cup, Yandex Algorithm, Russian Code Cup, and Topcoder Open. The university's priority research areas include IT, Photonics, Robotics, Quantum Communications, Solution Chemistry and Advanced Materials, Translational Medicine, Urban Studies, Art & Science, and Science Communication.

In 2016, ITMO University received the UNESCO Medal "For the Development of Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies" for its unique environment that unites science, education and innovations.

Since 2016, ITMO University has been a constant feature in the world's top 100 universities in Computer Science according to the Times Higher Education (THE) subject ranking. In 2019, the university made its debut in the world's top 100 universities in Automation & Control, and strengthened its position in Nanotechnology (top 300) and Materials Science (top 400) in the Global Ranking of Academic Subjects (GRAS) of Shanghai Ranking (Academic Ranking of World Universities, ARWU).

According to the Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) subject rankings for 2019, ITMO University is one of the world's top 300 universities in Engineering & Technology and Physics & Astronomy; it also became the only Russian university to be featured in the QS Art & Design subject group (top 200 universities).

In 2019, ITMO University was featured in the world's top 500 higher education institutions according to THE and QS World University Rankings, and represented in 13 subject rankings published by ARWU, THE and QS.

IT's MOre than a UNIVERSITY!

ITMO University

Related Solar Cells Articles from Brightsurf:

Solar cells of the future
Organic solar cells are cheaper to produce and more flexible than their counterparts made of crystalline silicon, but do not offer the same level of efficiency or stability.

A blast of gas for better solar cells
Treating silicon with carbon dioxide gas in plasma processing brings simplicity and control to a key step for making solar cells.

Record efficiency for printed solar cells
A new study reports the highest efficiency ever recorded for full roll-to-roll printed perovskite solar cells.

Next gen solar cells perform better when there's a camera around
A literal ''trick of the light'' can detect imperfections in next-gen solar cells, boosting their efficiency to match that of existing silicon-based versions, researchers have found.

On the trail of organic solar cells' efficiency
Scientists at TU Dresden and Hasselt University in Belgium investigated the physical causes that limit the efficiency of novel solar cells based on organic molecular materials.

Exciting tweaks for organic solar cells
A molecular tweak has improved organic solar cell performance, bringing us closer to cheaper, efficient, and more easily manufactured photovoltaics.

For cheaper solar cells, thinner really is better
Researchers at MIT and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have outlined a pathway to slashing costs further, this time by slimming down the silicon cells themselves.

Flexible thinking on silicon solar cells
Combining silicon with a highly elastic polymer backing produces solar cells that have record-breaking stretchability and high efficiency.

Perovskite solar cells get an upgrade
Rice University materials scientists find inorganic compounds quench defects in perovskite-based solar cells and expand their tolerance of light, humidity and heat.

Can solar technology kill cancer cells?
Michigan State University scientists have revealed a new way to detect and attack cancer cells using technology traditionally reserved for solar power.

Read More: Solar Cells News and Solar Cells Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.