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Among colon cancer patients, smokers have worse outcomes than non-smokers

February 08, 2017

In an analysis of more than 18,000 patients treated for colon cancer, current smokers were 14 percent more likely to die from their colon cancer within five years than patients who had never smoked. Among patients treated by surgery only, current smokers were 21 percent more likely to die from their colon cancer than patients who had never smoked.

"While further research is needed to elucidate mechanisms, continued efforts to encourage smoking prevention and cessation may yield benefits in terms of improved survival from colon cancer," wrote the authors of the Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics study.
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Wiley

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