Nav: Home

Study reveals complementary medicine use remains hidden to conventional medicine providers

February 08, 2019

Research reveals that 1 in 3 complementary medicine (CM) users do not disclose their CM use to their medical providers, posing significant direct and indirect risks of adverse effects and harm due to unsafe concurrent use of CM and conventional medicine use.

The first international systematic review conducted by researchers at the Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine provides an update on the prevalence and characteristics of disclosure of CM use to medical providers since previous research conducted in 2003.

"This figure has hardly changed since the last review of the topic 13 years ago. This is despite the fact that the authors of every paper included in our review called for improved communication between doctors and patients to facilitate better disclosure," says lead author and PhD candidate Hope Foley.

The study found that disclosure of CM use to medical providers is influenced by the providers' communication style. Perceived provider knowledge of CM use was reported to be a barrier to discussions about CM use in clinical consultations.

When the actual response of the provider to disclosure of CM use was explored by researchers, negative or discouraging responses were reported by less than 20% of disclosers or were not reported at all. Positive or encouraging responses to disclosure of CM use by a medical doctor were reported by a substantial proportion of respondents and neutral responses from medical providers were also common.

More than 67% of participants agreed that disclosure was important.

"Patient autonomy and preference are important features of person-centered care to be considered by medical providers alongside safety and treatment outcomes in their patient management," the authors write.

On a global public health level, the World Health Organisation recognises the importance of integrated care which encompasses CM. Yet public health policies and procedures often create barriers to effective integration, limiting appropriate management of concurrent use and access to the recognised benefits of integrated care".

"As CM becomes more As CM becomes more separate from mainstream health services, disclosure is only going to become more and more important for public safety."

The researchers conclude that in the context of contemporary person-centred health care models, discussions and subsequent disclosure of CM use may be facilitated by direct inquiry about CM use by providers.

"This is a topic which should be treated with gravity," the researchers say. "Disclosure of CM use is central to wider patient management and care in contemporary clinical settings, particularly for primary care providers acting as gatekeeper in their patients' care."
-end-


University of Technology Sydney

Related Management Articles:

Big ideas in performance management 2.0
Industrial-era performance management paradigms and practices are outdated and ineffective in the modern VUCA work environment.
Water management grows farm profits
A study investigates effects of irrigation management on yield and profit.
What we can learn from Indigenous land management
First Nations peoples' world view and connection to Country provide a rich source of knowledge and innovations for better land and water management policies when Indigenous decision-making is enacted, Australian researchers say.
Study changes guidelines for sepsis management
University of Arizona Health Sciences researcher ends debate among physicians regarding sepsis management.
Native approaches to fire management
In collaboration with tribes in Northern California, researchers examined traditional fire management practices and found that these approaches, if expanded, could strengthen cultures and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires in Northern California.
Is wildfire management 'for the birds?'
Spotted owl populations are in decline all along the West Coast, and as climate change increases the risk of large and destructive wildfires in the region, these iconic animals face the real threat of losing even more of their forest habitat.
More woodland management needed to help save dormice
Managing woodlands to a greater extent could help stop the decline of Britain's dormice, new research suggests.
The surgical management of Ebstein anomaly
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp.
Asthma management: Allocating duties
Some examples of the persistence of incompletely resolved issues in asthma management are: 1) misdiagnosis -- with the related complex consequences --, especially in children population and, 2) poor control of the disease.
A holistic approach for mycetoma management
Mycetoma, a neglected tropical disease, can cause severe disfigurement and disability if not treated early.
More Management News and Management Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Uncharted
There's so much we've yet to explore–from outer space to the deep ocean to our own brains. This hour, Manoush goes on a journey through those uncharted places, led by TED Science Curator David Biello.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#555 Coronavirus
It's everywhere, and it felt disingenuous for us here at Science for the People to avoid it, so here is our episode on Coronavirus. It's ok to give this one a skip if this isn't what you want to listen to right now. Check out the links below for other great podcasts mentioned in the intro. Host Rachelle Saunders gets us up to date on what the Coronavirus is, how it spreads, and what we know and don't know with Dr Jason Kindrachuk, Assistant Professor in the Department of Medical Microbiology and infectious diseases at the University of Manitoba. And...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 1: Numbers
In a recent Radiolab group huddle, with coronavirus unraveling around us, the team found themselves grappling with all the numbers connected to COVID-19. Our new found 6 foot bubbles of personal space. Three percent mortality rate (or 1, or 2, or 4). 7,000 cases (now, much much more). So in the wake of that meeting, we reflect on the onslaught of numbers - what they reveal, and what they hide.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.