Racial disparities exist in access to kidney transplantation

February 09, 2012

A new study published in the American Journal of Transplantation reveals that racial disparities exist in both the early and late steps in access to kidney transplantation. This study is part of the February special themed issue of the journal on racial disparity.

Led by Rachel E. Patzer, PhD, MPH, of the Emory Transplant Center in Atlanta, Georgia, researchers examined 2,291 adult patients referred for renal transplant evaluation at a single transplant center in the Southeastern U.S. from 2005-2007, followed through May 2010. Demographic and clinical data were assessed and Cox models were used to examine the effect of race on referral, evaluation, waitlisting, and organ receipt.

Of the 2,291 patients, 64.9% were black, the mean age was 49.4 years, and 33.6% lived in poor neighborhoods.

Racial disparities were observed in access to referral, transplant evaluation, waitlisting, and organ receipt. Socioeconomic factors, including health insurance and access to care, explained almost 1/3 of the lower rate of transplant among black vs. white patients.

However, even after adjusting for demographic, clinical, and socioeconomic factors, blacks had a 59% lower rate of transplant than whites.

"Despite near-universal health care coverage for end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients through the Medicare ESRD program, black ESRD patients are at a disadvantage to receive a kidney transplantation," Patzer notes. "Socioeconomic status really accounts for about 30% of this observed racial disparity in transplant access. Further research is needed to identify what may be explaining the racial disparities that still exist in access to kidney transplantation."
-end-


Wiley

Related Kidney Transplantation Articles from Brightsurf:

Kidney transplantation between people with HIV is safe, NIH study finds
Kidney transplantation from deceased donors with HIV to people living with both HIV and end-stage kidney disease is feasible and safe, investigators supported by the National Institutes of Health have found.

Acute kidney injury and end stage kidney disease in severe COVID-19
Many COVID-19 patients experience hematuria, proteinuria and elevated serum creatinine concentration early in the course of the disease.

Study examines factors affecting racial disparities before kidney transplantation
Among adults with kidney failure who were referred for transplantation, 60% of black and 66% of white patients were waitlisted within the first year.

A world first: Assessing kidney quality before transplantation using photoacoustic imaging
Demand for kidney transplants is so high that doctors now routinely accept damaged donor kidneys, with limited means to assess their quality.

Elderly patients also benefit from kidney transplantation
So far, kidney transplantation has generally not been offered to elderly patients (>75 years) because of the perioperative risks.

Disparities persist in early kidney transplantation despite policy changes
The proportion of preemptive transplants -- when a patient receives a kidney transplant before starting dialysis -- increased after implementation of the 2014 Kidney Allocation System from 9.0% to 9.8% of all kidney transplants.

Kidney transplants from donors with HCV safe and functional 1 year post-transplantation
There has been a substantial increase in the number of transplants using HCV-infected kidneys across the United States.

Timing of Medicare loss may affect long-term success of kidney transplantation
Kidney transplant recipients under 65 years of age qualify for Medicare coverage following transplantation, but coverage ends after three years.

Kidney transplantation to minority patients with a different blood types is safe
Minority patients achieve the same outcomes if they receive donor kidneys that are fully immunologically compatible compared with patients who receive the organs from fully compatible donors, according to study findings from Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn.

Kidney-resident macrophages -- a role for healing during acute kidney injury?
Researchers have found that, during acute kidney injury in a mouse model, the kidney-resident macrophages are reprogrammed to a developmental state, resembling these same cells when they are found in newborn mice.

Read More: Kidney Transplantation News and Kidney Transplantation Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.