Virus Evolution awarded Best New Journal in Science category at the 2017 PROSE Awards

February 09, 2017

Oxford University Press is pleased to announce that one of its journals, Virus Evolution, has won the 2017 PROSE Award for the Best New Journal in the Science, Technology, and Medicine category. The PROSE Awards recognize the best in professional and scholarly publishing, by bringing attention to ground-breaking papers on diverse topics in 53 categories.

Virus Evolution is a new Open Access journal focusing on the long-term evolution of viruses, viruses as a model system for studying evolutionary processes, viral molecular epidemiology, and environmental virology. The field of virus evolution has grown sharply in the past five years, partly due to the explosive growth in availability of genomic sequence data, which will continue to grow at an exponential rate over the coming years.

Virus Evolution provides a venue for in-depth discussion on the field of virus evolution. The journal aims to publish work that benefits science, technology, and medicine, and, by extension, the world at large. Virus Evolution provides authors with fast decision times and timely publication of accepted papers, with a prestigious international editorial board offering quality, constructive peer review.

On February 2, 2017, the Professional and Scholarly Publishing (PSP) Division of the Association of American Publishers presented the PROSE Awards for Excellence at a special luncheon ceremony in Washington, DC. The PSP Annual Conference recognize authors and publishers for their commitment to pioneering works of research and for contributing to the conception, production, and design of landmark works in their fields.

Virus Evolution was one of 12 Oxford University Press titles to receive an award or honorable mention at the 2017 Prose Awards.
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Oxford University Press USA

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