Nav: Home

Simple tests may predict older patients' risk of falling while hospitalized

February 09, 2018

A study of 807 older individuals admitted to hospital found that those who had poorer physical function at the time of admission were more likely to fall during their hospital stay; 329 falls occurred in 189 patients, including 161 injurious falls, of which 24 were serious. Poor functional performance--in areas including balance, gait speed, and lower-limb strength--was also associated with a higher incidence of falls that resulted in physical injury or fractures.

The new findings published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research indicate that a simple physical performance test at the time of admission may help clinicians take steps to prevent in-hospital falls and consequent injuries in older patients.
-end-


Wiley

Related Falls Articles:

Study seeks to improve screening for falls in emergency departments
When individuals visit the emergency department after falling, they may receive a diagnosis reflecting the injury sustained -- such as fractures, contusions, etc.
Severe foot pain linked to recurrent falls
Researchers from Hebrew Senior Life's Institute for Aging Research have discovered that foot pain - particularly severe foot pain -- correlates to a higher incidence of recurrent falls.
Researchers solve the century-old mystery of Blood Falls
A research team led by the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Colorado College has solved a century-old mystery involving a famous red waterfall in Antarctica.
Can virtual reality help us prevent falls in the elderly and others?
Every year, falls lead to hospitalization or death for hundreds of thousands of elderly Americans.
'Tiny earthquakes' help scientists predict mountain rock falls
Scientists have developed a new way to predict when mountain rock falls will happen -- in regions where people go skiing and climbing.
Brain activity may predict risk of falls in older people
Measuring the brain activity of healthy, older adults while they walk and talk at the same time may help predict their risk of falls later, according to a study published in the Dec.
Brain activity may predict risk of falls in older adults
Falls are the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal injuries among older Americans and all too often lead to physical decline and loss of independence.
Combined training may prevent falls associated with Parkinson's and other disorders
A combination of virtual reality and treadmill training may prevent dangerous falls associated with aging, Parkinson's disease, cognitive impairment and/or dementia, according to a new Tel Aviv University study.
Home handy but not so stable: Steep rise in ladder-related falls
Researchers at QUT have warned about the rising popularity of Do-It-Yourself (DIY) culture after a steep rise in the number of people falling from ladders.
Theoretical climbing rope could brake falls
University of Utah mathematicians showed it is theoretically possible to design ideal climbing ropes to safely slow falling rock and mountain climbers like brakes decelerate a car.

Related Falls Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Crisis
There's no greater threat to humanity than climate change. What can we do to stop the worst consequences? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can save our planet and whether we can do it in time. Guests include climate activist Greta Thunberg, chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox, research scientist Sean Davis, food innovator Bruce Friedrich, and psychologist Per Espen Stoknes.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...