Springer to partner with the Gesellschaft für Biologische Systematik

February 10, 2010

Springer and the Gesellschaft für Biologische Systematik (Society for Biological Systematics) will collaborate to publish the society's official journal Organisms Diversity & Evolution beginning in 2010. The journal was previously published by Elsevier. Volume 10, Issue 1, will be published by Springer in March 2010.

Published five times a year, Organisms Diversity & Evolution is devoted to furthering the understanding of all aspects of organismal diversity, particularly in an evolutionary framework. Topics include the systematics, phylogenetics, taxonomy, biogeography, biodiversity and/or evolution of any organismal group, recent or fossil. The journal contains original articles on high-quality research; short papers describing new laboratory methods, bioinformatic tools and databases; forum papers on issues relevant to the journal's main areas of interest; and comprehensive reviews. Dr. Olaf R.P. Bininda-Emonds, Professor of Systematics and Evolutionary Biology at Carl von Ossietzky University in Oldenburg, Germany, is editor-in-chief.

Sabine Schwarz, Senior Editor of Biomedicine and Life Sciences at Springer, said: "We are honored and excited about the Gesellschaft für Biologische Systematik's decision to publish their journal with Springer, and are looking forward to a fruitful collaboration. It is fantastic news that we can start publishing Organisms Diversity & Evolution in 2010, which is the International Year of Biodiversity. This will give the journal even more exposure and international visibility."

Dr. Regine Jahn, President of the Gesellschaft für Biologische Systematik, said, "Research in global biodiversity is one of the focal points of biosciences today, and it has enormous implications for science, politics and society. Organisms Diversity & Evolution, as the official journal of the Gesellschaft für Biologische Systematik, can be seen as a scientific publishing platform for high-quality articles from all areas of current biodiversity research. We're looking forward to a constructive and productive collaboration with Springer."

Fast publication in Online First™ will provide immediate access to new research results in Organisms Diversity & Evolution on www.springerlink.com, Springer's online information platform. Editorial Manager, an online peer review and author submission system, Cross Reference Linking, and Alert services will be fully implemented for the journal. In addition, all authors, via the Springer Open Choice™ program, have the option of publishing their articles using the open access publishing model.
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Springer (www.springer.com) is a leading global scientific publisher of books and journals, delivering quality content through innovative information products and services. It publishes close to 500 academic and professional society journals. Springer is part of the publishing group Springer Science+Business Media. In the science, technology and medicine (STM) sector, the group publishes around 2,000 journals and more than 6,500 new books a year, as well as the largest STM eBook Collection worldwide. Springer has operations in about 20 countries in Europe, the USA, and Asia, and more than 5,000 employees.

Organisms Diversity & Evolution: ISSN: 1439-6092 (print version), ISSN: 1618-1077 (electronic version)

Springer

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