CUNY sociologist wins 2017 GRRI, publishes book on cross-national attitudes about homosexuality

February 10, 2017

Dr. Amy Adamczyk, Professor and Interim Chair of Sociology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Graduate Center, City University of New York (CUNY), has received a 2017 Global Religion Research Initiative (GRRI) Award from Center for the Study of Religion and Society at the University of Notre Dame. In addition, Dr. Adamczyk's groundbreaking book, which investigates the factors that shape cross-national attitudes about homosexuality, appeared in January 2017 from the University of California Press.

Dr. Adamczyk will use her GRRI curriculum development grant to create a new seminar for criminal justice doctoral students called Religion, Morality, and Crime in Global Perspective. There is a close relationship between religion, morality, and crime. While a lot of research shows that more religious people may be less likely to engage in some deviant and minor criminal acts, religion has also been used to justify major crimes, like terrorism. This seminar will investigate the theoretical and empirical research of this timely topic, offering needed insight into our current understanding of the world and America's place within it.

Dr. Adamczyk also contributes to the topical conversation about diversity, inclusivity and tolerance in her new book, Cross-National Public Opinion about Homosexuality: Examining Attitudes across the Globe.

Public opinion about homosexuality varies substantially around the world. While residents in some nations have embraced gay rights as human rights, people in many other countries find homosexuality unacceptable. What creates such big differences in attitudes? This book shows that cross-national differences in opinion can be explained by the strength of democratic institutions, the level of economic development, and the religious context of the places where people live. Dr. Adamczyk uses survey data from almost ninety societies, case studies of various countries, content analysis of newspaper articles, and in-depth interviews to examine how demographic and individual characteristics influence acceptance of homosexuality.

Dr. Adamczyk synthesizes her mixed-methods approach within a robust theoretical framework to understand the larger forces that shape attitudes towards same-sex relationships, and her book illuminates the origins of sexual prejudice and tolerance as well as the intersection of the politics of sexuality, economics and religion.

Dr. Amy Adamczyk is Professor of Sociology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Her research focuses on how different contexts (e.g. nations, counties, friendship groups), and personal religious beliefs shape people's deviant, criminal, and health-related attitudes and behaviors. To learn more about her book, please visit http://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520288768
-end-
The City University of New York is the nation's leading urban public university. Founded in New York City in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, and additional professional schools. The University serves nearly 275,000 degree-credit students and 218,083 adult, continuing and professional education students.

For more information, please contact Shante Booker (shante.booker@cuny.edu) or visit http://www.cuny.edu/research.

The City University of New York

Related Religion Articles from Brightsurf:

How religion can hamper economic progress
Study from Bocconi University on impact of antiscientific curricula of Catholic schools on accumulation of human capital in France during the 2nd Industrial Revolution could hold lessons on impact of religion on technological progress today.

CU Denver study looks into the connection between religion and equal pay
Traci Sitzmann, an Associate Professor at the University of Colorado Denver Business School, and Elizabeth Campbell, an Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota, provide empirical evidence and an explanation into why religion perpetuates the gender wage gap.

How religion can heighten or help with financial stress
Researchers found that some people experience financial stress due, in part, to their religion's demands on their time and money.

Religion associated with HPV vaccination rate for college women
A survey of female college students finds 25% had not been vaccinated for HPV and religion may be a contributing factor.

Rise of religion pre-dates Incas at Lake Titicaca
An ancient group of people made ritual offerings to supernatural deities near the Island of the Sun in Lake Titicaca, Bolivia, about 500 years earlier than the Incas, according to an international team of researchers.

Sociologists study the impact religion has on child development
Do children raised by religious parents have better social and psychological development than those raised in non-religious homes?

Research: Religion affects consumer choices on specialty foods
People with strong religious beliefs are more likely to buy fat-free, sugar-free or gluten-free foods than natural or organic foods, according to new research that could influence the marketing of those specialty food products.

Drug use, religion explain 'reverse gender gap' on marijuana
Women tend to be more conservative than men on political questions related to marijuana.

UTSA researcher studies the impact religion has on sleep quality
Christopher Ellison, in The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) Department of Sociology, Terrence D.

Some black and Latino Christians rely on religion for healing
Christians who are comparatively well-represented in the medical field, like Korean-Americans, understand the relationship between faith and health differently than those who are not, like African-Americans and Latinos.

Read More: Religion News and Religion Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.