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Five things to know about egg freezing

February 10, 2020

Egg freezing for age-related fertility is becoming more common, and a short article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides quick reference points on the topic for primary care providers. http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191191
    1. Elective egg freezing is a way to help patients increase their chance of pregnancy at a later age
    2. Patients aged 35 or younger with normal ovarian reserve have the best chance of success, although future live birth is not guaranteed
    3. The treatment process usually takes 10-14 days
    4. Fees for this treatment are not covered in Canada by government health insurance
    5. Frozen eggs do not expire, but many clinics have age limits after which they will not proceed with transfer of embryos created from the frozen eggs.
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"Elective egg freezing for age-related fertility decline" is published February 10, 2020

Podcast post-embargo link: https://soundcloud.com/cmajpodcasts/191191-five

Canadian Medical Association Journal

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