Alzheimer funding analyzer launched on Journal of Alzheimer's Disease website

February 11, 2016

The Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (JAD) is proud to announce the launch of the Alzheimer's Funding Analyzer (AFA) on the JAD website. It is a free service that is part of a new suite of online features that have been designed to serve the needs of the Alzheimer disease (AD) research community.

AFA presents in-depth data on 115 funders from 42 countries including all of the European Union, Australia, Canada, Ireland, Qatar, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

"It is increasingly difficult to keep up with all of the organizations currently funding AD research around the globe," explained JAD's Editor-in-Chief George Perry, PhD, Dean and Professor of Biology, The University of Texas at San Antonio. "For this reason, JAD has developed the AFA to make this information systematically available. It will enable researchers to identify research activities years before they appear in the published literature."

Working with development partner ÜberResearch, a solutions and services company focused on the specific needs of science funders, AFA includes all funding related to AD drawn from ÜberResearch's extensive grant database of more than $900 billion of funded research, representing more than 1.9 million projects from 150 funders like the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation in the U.S. and the Wellcome Trust and U.K. Research Councils in the U.K.

The AFA allows users to easily locate funding related to AD and analyze funding streams and trends. Further, it facilitates a better understanding of research organizations' funding portfolios and the funding patterns of specific funders, both of which are critical when developing grant applications. For example, users can conduct line-of-investigation queries (e.g., tau, ApoE4, vaccine) to look for funding trends and to see which investigators in which countries have been the most successful in obtaining funding in a given area of AD research. New funding information will be added to the AFA on an ongoing basis.

"We invite all AD researchers to register at http://www.j-alz.com/funding for this valuable service, which we are pleased to make available at no charge," added Dr. Perry. Registration not only enbles users to access the AFA, but also use other features on the site.
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