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4 opioid-related articles: Prescribing trends, overdose deaths, disparities in prescriptions

February 11, 2019

Bottom Line:JAMA Internal Medicine is publishing four opioid-related articles (an original investigation, invited commentary and two research letters) that report on racial/ethnic and income disparities in the prescription of opioids and other other controlled medications in California, racial differences in opioid overdose deaths in New York, and county-level opioid prescribing in the United States.

Want to embed links to these articles in your story? These full-text links will be live at the embargo time:

Original Investigation: Assessment of Racial/Ethnic and Income Disparities in the Prescription of Opioids and Other Controlled Medications in California https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/2723625?guestAccessKey=7fe163de-0ce6-4464-bf27-3c0dfafbc437

Invited Commentary: Opioid Prescribing Trends and the Physician's Role in Responding to the Public Health Crisis https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/2723622?guestAccessKey=eaeac693-8773-4ecc-8353-6327c9902121

Research Letter: County-Level Opioid Prescribing in the United States, 2015 and 2017 https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/2723623?guestAccessKey=fbc1862d-97ca-4f52-9905-1edcf73387a2

Research Letter: Racial Differences in Opioid Overdose Deaths in New York City, 2017 https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/2723624?guestAccessKey=f9becdd5-b7cb-4264-a766-1cba0a5753c9

Editor's Note: Please see the articles for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial and conflict of interest disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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Media advisory: The full studies and commentary are linked to this news release.

JAMA Internal Medicine

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