USDA Forest Service publishes wildland-urban interface assessment

February 12, 2003

(Asheville, NC) -- The USDA Forest Service recently released "Human Influences on Forest Ecosystems: the Southern Wildland-Urban Interface (WUI) Assessment." A companion study to the Southern Forest Resource Assessment (SFRA) published last fall, the WUI Assessment examines the urban and rural fringes of the Southern landscape where multiple land uses meet forested lands.

Rapidly increasing human populations and spreading cities and suburbs throughout the South are creating both opportunities and challenges for natural resource managers. SFRA found that urbanization will have the "most direct, immediate, and permanent effects on the extent, condition, and health of forests." The WUI Assessment examines these effects, provides a framework for addressing issues of sustaining healthy and productive forests in the South, and identifies critical research and information needs.

One of the primary driving issues that led to the WUI Assessment was the major wildfires in Florida in 1998. The complex challenges the 1998 wildfire season presented to the people who live and work in the wildland-urban interface pointed out the need for more information to support quality decision-making and policy development by local agencies. Other critical issues in the interface relate to land use change, economics, water, wildlife habitat, and invasive species. In addition to examining current interface conditions, the WUI Assessment establishes a framework for future research and development, technology transfer, and policymaking.

Co-Team Leaders Ed Macie, of the Forest Service Southern Region's Urban and Community Forestry Program in Atlanta, and Annie Hermansen, of the Southern Research Station (SRS) Southern Center for Wildland-Urban Interface Research and Information, in Gainesville, FL, used data from focus groups conducted in several States to gather information for the Assessment. They compiled additional data and worked with selected scientists to provide an interdisciplinary perspective on interface issues across the South.
-end-
To request the 160-page report, call (828-257-4830), or send an email to pubrequest@srs.fs.usda.gov and ask for GTR-SRS-55. The report is also available online at http://www.interfacesouth.usda.gov/assessment.

USDA Forest Service ‑ Southern Research Station

Related Invasive Species Articles from Brightsurf:

The invasive species that Europe needs to erradicate most urgently are identified
An international research team analyzed the risk impact and the effectiveness of possible erradication strategies for invasive species already in the region as well as those that have yet to arrive

Crayfish 'trapping' fails to control invasive species
Despite being championed by a host of celebrity chefs, crayfish 'trapping' is not helping to control invasive American signal crayfish, according to new research by UCL and King's College London.

Climate change is impacting the spread of invasive animal species
What factors influence the spread of invasive animal species in our oceans?

Invasive alien species may soon cause dramatic global biodiversity loss
An increase of 20 to 30 per cent of invasive non-native (alien) species would lead to dramatic future biodiversity loss worldwide.

Protected areas worldwide at risk of invasive species
Protected areas across the globe are effectively keeping invasive animals at bay, but the large majority of them are at risk of invasions, finds a involving UCL and led by the Chinese Academy of Science, in a study published in Nature Communications.

Charismatic invasive species have an easier time settling into new habitats
An international study, in which the University of Cordoba participated, assessed the influence of charisma in the handling of invasive species and concluded that the perception people have of them can hinder our control over these species and condition their spread

Invasive species with charisma have it easier
It's the outside that counts: Their charisma has an impact on the introduction and image of alien species and can even hinder their control.

Invasive species that threaten biodiversity on the Antarctic Peninsula are identified
Mediterranean mussels, seaweed and some species of land plants and invertebrates are among the 13 species that are most likely to damage the ecosystems on the Antarctic Peninsula.

Research networks can help BRICS countries combat invasive species
BRICS countries need more networks of researchers dedicated to invasion science if they wish to curb the spread of invasive species within and outside of their borders.

Look out, invasive species: The robots are coming
Researchers published the first experiments to gauge whether biomimetic robotic fish can induce fear-related changes in mosquitofish, aiming to discover whether the highly invasive species might be controlled without toxicants or trapping methods harmful to wildlife.

Read More: Invasive Species News and Invasive Species Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.