AIAA Space Colonization TC recommends actions for implementation of lunar settlements

February 13, 2007

February 13, 2007 - Reston, VA - The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Space Colonization Technical Committee (SCTC) has developed a position statement which recommends specific research, development, technology and engineering goals be implemented in order to establish a Moon base by 2015 and open new frontiers to human space exploration.

The AIAA/SCTC paper emphasizes human settlement of the Moon; development of lunar observatories, energy and resources uses; and sustained, active encouragement of private and international enterprise. It recommends the establishment of the scientific and industrial capabilities of a permanent lunar settlement and development of the commercial revenue sources on the Moon.

Recommendations in the paper cover the early period (present - 2015), mid-period (2015-2025) and far period (2025-2050). The SCTC also calls for the United States to work with international partners to pursue free-market rules to the development of space; international conventions on property and mineral rights; and land management conventions to include provisions for homesteading.

The AIAA/SCTC supports a strengthened space program through robust implementation of lunar settlements with commercial and international enterprises.
-end-
To read the entire position statement, "Robust Implementations of Lunar Settlements with Commercial and International Enterprise (Moon Base 2015)," click here or go to http://www.aiaa.org/content.cfm?pageid=535

Headquartered in suburban Washington, DC, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) serves over 35,000 aerospace professionals in 65 regional sections and 79 countries. AIAA membership is drawn from all levels of industry, academia, private research organizations, and government and focuses on emerging technologies in aviation, space and defense.

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

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