The desert is dying

February 13, 2007

Researchers from University of Bergen have found that trees, which are a main resource for desert people and their flocks, are in significant decline in the hyper-arid Eastern Desert of Egypt.

In places more than 50% of the mature trees have disappeared between 1965 and 2003, while almost no new trees have been recruited. Despite extreme aridity the main cause of tree mortality seems not to be climate, but commercial charcoal production. This indicates that the traditional and sustainable indigenous resource management, which desert people have developed through millennia, is changing.

Desertification has been recurrently discussed and questioned since the 1970s. The focus has been on desert borderlands, while changes in sparse but important vegetation resources within the desert core have been neglected.
-end-
This study will be published on February 14, 2007 in PLoS ONE, the international, peer-reviewed, open-access, online publication from the Public Library of Science (PLoS).

Disclaimer

The following press release refers to an upcoming article in PLoS ONE. The release has been provided by the article authors and/or their institutions. Any opinions expressed in these releases or articles are the personal views of the contributors, and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of PLoS. PLoS expressly disclaims any and all warranties and liability in connection with the information found in the releases and articles and your use of such information.

Citation: Andersen GL, Krzywinski K (2007) Mortality, Recruitment and Change of Desert Tree Populations in a Hyper-Arid Environment. PLoS ONE 2(2): e208. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0000208

PLEASE ADD THE LINK TO THE PUBLISHED ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0000208
PRESS ONLY PREVIEW OF THE ARTICLE: http://www.plos.org/press/pone-02-02-andersen.pdf

CONTACT:

Knut Krzywinski
Email: Knut.Krzywinski@bio.uib.no

PLOS

Related Focus Articles from Brightsurf:

To protect nature's benefits, focus on people
New paper calls for the consideration of people's diverse needs in order to develop effective nature-based policies and investments in ecosystems.

How to tune out common odors and focus on important ones
Quantitative biologists at CSHL have figured out how a fly brain learns to ignore overwhelmingly prevalent, mundane odors to focus on more important ones.

Praise, rather than punish, to see up to 30% greater focus in the classroom
To improve behavior in class, teachers should focus on praising children for good behavior, rather than telling them off for being disruptive, according to a new study published in Educational Psychology.

Smart glasses follow our eyes, focus automatically
By using eye-tracking technology to automatically control a pair of autofocus lenses, engineers have created a prototype for 'autofocals' designed to restore proper vision in people who would ordinarily need progressive lenses.

More sleep may help teens with ADHD focus and organize
Teenagers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may benefit from more sleep to help them focus, plan and control their emotions.

Money-savers focus attention -- and eyes -- on the prize
Why can some people patiently save for the future, while others opt for fewer dollars now?

Local focus could help tackle global problems
People's love for their local areas could be harnessed to tackle global environmental problems, researchers say.

How the brain enables us to rapidly focus attention
University of Queensland researchers have discovered a key mechanism in the brain that may underlie our ability to rapidly focus attention.

Flying focus: Controlling lasers through time and space
Scientists have produced an extremely bright spot of light that can travel at any speed -- including faster than the speed of light.

Previously grainy wheat genome comes into focus
An international consortium has completed the sequence of wheat's colossal genome.

Read More: Focus News and Focus Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.