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Randomized clinical trial for suicide prevention intervention in military personnel

February 13, 2019

Bottom Line: A randomized clinical trial of about 650 U.S. Army soldiers and Marines showed inconsistent results for a suicide prevention intervention that supplemented standard care with caring text messages to reduce suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Two accompanying editorials discuss the inexpensive intervention and potential reasons that could help to explain the uncertain results in a military population.

Authors: Amanda H. Kerbrat, M.S.W., University of Washington, Seattle, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/ jamapsychiatry.2018.4530 )

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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JAMA Psychiatry

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