Sea worms and jellyfish treat cancer and kill insects

February 14, 2019

Scientists of the Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (PIBOC) of the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS) and the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) found out marine invertebrates living in Troitsa Bay, the Sea of Japan, contain biologically active compounds with strong antitumor and antimicrobial properties, and also capable of killing insects. An article on that was published in the Russian Journal of Marine Biology.

Scientists have studied 9 species of marine invertebrates -- sea anemones, marine worms, nemerteans, and jellyfish -- and discover they are carriers of biologically active compounds with immunostimulating properties, which have a potential to prevent a metastasis proliferation of malignant tumors.

"Marine invertebrates are a promising source of biologically active compounds that can be applied to design medical drugs of a new generation. The therapeutic effects of such compounds are of a broad range. They can be antioxidants, possess cardioprotective, analgesic, antimicrobial, antitumor, and many other properties. " -- Says Elena Leychenko, Associate Professor of the Department of Bioorganic Chemistry and Biotechnology of the School of Natural Sciences (SNS), FEFU.

Scientists consider the segmented worms Eulalia viridis and the so-called marine 'peanut worms' (sipunculids) Phascolostoma agassizii are of the highest pharmacological potential among all invertebrates referred to in the article. Extracts obtained from these organisms were non-toxic to mouse erythrocytes and splenocytes, showing a significant antibacterial and anti-tumor effect.

It's noteworthy that the majority of extracts retrieved from all nine experimental samples of invertebrates were harmless to mammalian cells and at the same time toxic to insects and crustaceans. It means that the isolated compounds are suitable not only for the development of the new drugs but also for the manufacturing of effective insecticides --chemicals for combating harmful insects. In particular, the extract of the ringed worms Lepidonotuss quamatus was toxic to the larvae.

Scientists point out the expediency of further research of marine invertebrates to isolate the antitumor compounds from them.

Earlier, scientists of PIBOC within the framework of the joint PIBOC (FEB-RAS) -- FEFU program "Fundamental and Applied Chemistry, Specialization - Medical Chemistry" conducted a study of actinium Heteractis magnifica. These seabed dwellers turned out to be helpful to fight Alzheimer's disease. Anemones of this kind contain peptides with neuroprotective activity. They slow down the inflammatory process and the accompanying destruction of cell neurons causing Alzheimer's disease for the treatment of which currently there is no medicine.
-end-


Far Eastern Federal University

Related Antimicrobial Articles from Brightsurf:

Antimicrobial peptides with anticancer properties
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this article the authors Zhong, Cuiyu; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Jiandong; Huang, Songyin; Yao, Yandan from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China; Guangzhou Regenerative Medicine and Health Guangdong Laboratory, Guangzhou, China and Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Guangdong, China review antimicrobial peptides with anticancer properties.

Treating COVID-19 could lead to increased antimicrobial resistance
Research led by the University of Plymouth suggests the increased use of antibiotics in the treatment of COVID-19 patients could be placing an additional burden on waste water treatment works, particularly those serving large or emergency hospitals

To prevent antimicrobial resistance, vaccinate the world's kids
Childhood vaccination may be a powerful tool in the fight against antimicrobial resistance in low- and middle-income countries, finds a new analysis led by researchers University of California, Berkeley.

Aquaculture at the crossroads of global warming and antimicrobial resistance
Antimicrobial resistance is responsible for some 700 000 deaths each year worldwide.

Who will lead the global surveillance of antimicrobial resistance via sewage?
In the journal Science, a DTU professor calls for someone to carry on a global surveillance of antimicrobial resistance and infectious diseases via sewage.

Sequencing sewage for antimicrobial resistance surveillance
In this Policy Forum, Frank Aarestrup and Mark Woolhouse advocate for the immediate establishment of a global antimicrobial resistance surveillance system based on the metagenomic sequencing of human sewage.

Novel composite antimicrobial film could take a bite out of foodborne illnesses
A novel composite film -- created by the bonding of an antimicrobial layer to conventional, clear polyethylene plastic typically used to vacuum-package foods such as meat and fish -- could help to decrease foodborne illness outbreaks, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

Squid pigments have antimicrobial properties
Ommochromes, the pigments that color the skin of squids and other invertebrates, could be used in the food and health sectors for their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties.

Antimicrobial resistance poses significant risk to people, the economy
CCA expert panel study provides new data on potential impact of antimicrobial resistance in Canada.

Antimicrobial resistance is drastically rising
An international team of researchers led by ETH has shown that antimicrobial-resistant infections are rapidly increasing in animals in low and middle income countries.

Read More: Antimicrobial News and Antimicrobial Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.