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Study suggests lazy eye associated with children's sense of self-perception

February 14, 2019

Bottom Line: This observational study looked at whether the condition known as "lazy eye" (amblyopia) was associated with an altered sense of self-perception in children (ages 3 to 7) and whether any differences in self-perception were associated with deficiencies in vision and fine motor skills like coordination. Researchers report that among 60 children with lazy eye, the condition was associated with lower measures of self-perception for peer acceptance and physical competence compared with 20 healthy children. The findings cannot be generalized to children with different types of lazy eye and researchers couldn't assess the association of glasses with children's self-perception because most children with lazy eye wore glasses.
-end-
Author: Eileen E. Birch. Ph.D., Retina Foundation of the Southwest, Dallas, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2018.7075)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Want to embed a link to this study in your story? This full-text link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/2723995?guestAccessKey=52b3fd36-65cc-4921-a778-86e9590a7dc4&utm_source=JAMA Network&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=21419

JAMA Ophthalmology

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