Nav: Home

Swoap at Williams receives NSF and NIH awards

February 15, 2000

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass., Feb. 16, 2000 -- Williams College has announced that Steven J. Swoap, assistant professor of biology, has been awarded two grants in support of his research: $497,000 from the National Science Foundation (NSF), and $95,783 from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Swoap will use his NSF award for a project whose objective it is to determine the mechanism of how restricting caloric intake lowers blood pressure and the NIH award to support research to determine why skeletal muscle becomes more fatiguable under disuse.

Swoap previously received an NSF grant in the amount of $228,000 to support his investigation into the genetic component of muscle fiber type adaptation.

His work has appeared in the American Journal of Physiology, Journal of Biological Chemistry, and Plant Physiology.

Swoap came to Williams in 1996 after serving as post-doctoral fellow in the Division of Molecular Cardiology-Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Texas' Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

He has taught at Collin County Community College and Irvine Valley College.

He received his B.A. from Trinity University in biology and biophysics (1990), and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Irvine in physiology and biophysics (1994).
-end-


Williams College

Related Biology Articles:

A new tool to decipher evolutionary biology
A new bioinformatics tool to compare genome data has been developed by teams from the Max F.
Biology's need for speed tolerates a few mistakes
In balancing speed and accuracy to duplicate DNA and produce proteins, Rice University researchers find evolution determined that speed is favored much more.
How to color a lizard: From biology to mathematics
Skin color patterns in animals arise from microscopic interactions among colored cells that obey equations discovered by Alan Turing.
Behavioral biology: Ripeness is all
In contrast to other members of the Drosophila family, the spotted-wing fly D. suzukii deposits its eggs in ripe fruits.
A systems biology perspective on molecular cytogenetics
Professor Henry Heng's team, from the medical school at Wayne State University, has published a perspective article titled A Systems Biology Perspective on Molecular Cytogenetics to address the issue.
Cell biology: Take the mRNA train
Messenger RNAs bearing the genetic information for the synthesis of proteins are delivered to defined sites in the cell cytoplasm by molecular motors.
Gravitational biology
Akira Kudo at Tokyo Institute of Technology(Tokyo Tech) and colleagues report in Scientific Reports, December 2016, that live-imaging and transcriptome analysis of medaka fish transgenic lines lead to immediate alteration of cells responsible for bone structure formation.
Biology's 'breadboard'
Understanding how the nervous system of the roundworm C. elegans works will give insights into how our vastly more complex brains function and is the subject of a paper in Nature Methods.
The use of Camelid antibodies for structural biology
The use of Camelid antibodies has important implications for future development of reagents for diagnosis and therapeutics in diseases involving a group of enzymes called serine proteases.
Misleading images in cell biology
Virtually all membrane proteins have been reported to be organized as clusters on cell surfaces, when in fact many of them are just single proteins which have been counted multiple times.

Related Biology Reading:

Campbell Biology (11th Edition)
by Lisa A. Urry (Author), Michael L. Cain (Author), Steven A. Wasserman (Author), Peter V. Minorsky (Author), Jane B. Reece (Author)

Biology (Quick Study Academic)
by Inc. BarCharts (Author)

Biology
by Peter H Raven (Author), George B Johnson Professor (Author), Kenneth A. Mason Dr. Ph.D. (Author), Jonathan Losos Dr. (Author), Susan Singer (Author)

Biology
by Yael Avissar (Author), Jung Choi (Author), Jean DeSaix (Author)

Biology
by Sylvia S. Mader Dr. (Author), Michael Windelspecht (Author)

Campbell Biology (10th Edition)
by Jane B. Reece (Author), Lisa A. Urry (Author), Michael L. Cain (Author), Steven A. Wasserman (Author), Peter V. Minorsky (Author), Robert B. Jackson (Author)

The Biology Coloring Book
by Robert D. Griffin (Author), Cinthea Vadala (Illustrator)

Barron's AP Biology, 6th Edition
by Deborah T. Goldberg M.S. (Author)

Biology
by Robert J. Brooker Professor Dr. (Author), Eric P. Widmaier Dr. (Author), Linda Graham Dr. Ph.D. (Author), Peter Stiling Dr. Ph.D. (Author)

Biology: The Essentials - No access code
by Mariëlle Hoefnagels Dr. (Author)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

The Story Behind The Numbers
Is life today better than ever before? Does the data bear that out? This hour, TED speakers explore the stories we tell with numbers — and whether those stories portray the full picture. Guests include psychologist Steven Pinker, economists Tyler Cowen and Michael Green, journalist Hanna Rosin, and environmental activist Paul Gilding.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#486 Volcanoes
This week we're talking volcanoes. Because there are few things that fascinate us more than the amazing, unstoppable power of an erupting volcano. First, Jessica Johnson takes us through the latest activity from the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii to help us understand what's happening with this headline-grabbing volcano. And Janine Krippner joins us to highlight some of the lesser-known volcanoes that can be found in the USA, the different kinds of eruptions we might one day see at them, and how damaging they have the potential to be. Related links: Kilauea status report at USGS A beginner's guide to Hawaii's otherworldly...