The effects of picking up primary school pupils on surrounding street's traffic

February 16, 2021

The schools in Vietnam observe a phenomenon that almost all parents send their children to school using private vehicles, mostly motorcycles. The parents usually park their vehicle on streets outside the school gates which can cause serious congestion and chances of of traffic accidents.

This study aims to identify the factors affecting the picking up of pupils at primary school by analysing typical primary schools in Hanoi city. The researchers used the binary logistic regression model to determine the factors that influence the decision of picking up pupils and the waiting duration of parents. The behaviour of motorcyclists during the process was identified and studied in detail using the Kinovea software. Through the results the researchers found that, on the way back home, almost all the parents use motorbikes (89.15%) to pick up their children. During their waiting time (8.48 minutes on average), the parents did a lot of illegal parking activities on the streets which caused a lot of trouble, testing the other commuters, and created chances for potential accidents in front of the primary school entrance gate. Risky picking-up behaviours were observed in the research.

Based on the results, several traffic management measures have been proposed by the researchers to improve traffic safety and to reduce traffic congestion in front of school gates. In addition, the results of the study is expected to provide a useful reference for policymakers and authorities.
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Read the Full-text article here: https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TOTJ-14-237

Bentham Science Publishers

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