Nav: Home

Atomic force imaging used to study nematodes

February 17, 2017

Soil nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans are very small roundworms that are studied with microscopy. They are widely used as model organisms in genetics, neurophysiology, and developmental and quantitative biology research. Their cuticle is a fitting testing material for toxicology and medication screening.

In a new study, researchers report for the first time the effective imaging of the nanoscale structure of C. elegans nematodes' cuticle using atomic force microscopy operating in PeakForce Tapping mode.

Research Associate Farida Akhatova explained, «Before the experiments we obtained traditional SEM images of nematodes. Unfortunately, the preparatory procedures sometimes do not allow to preserve a worm's body and alters the properties of their cuticle. AFM demonstrates typical morphological properties of epicuticle in high definition. However, the enhanced scanning also shows irregularities that appear on specimens' surfaces because of dehydration. Here we show AFM imaging in water for the first time. Although almost everything had been known about its surface anatomy, there are several peculiarities that had not yet been found out before the research». ###

Kazan Federal University

Related Nematodes Articles:

New survey confirms muscadine grapes are affected by parasitic nematodes
Muscadines are also known for being hearty grapes, with a tough skin that protects them from many fungal diseases.
Otherworldly worms with three sexes discovered in Mono Lake
The extreme environment of Mono Lake was thought to only house two species of animals -- until now.
New information on regulation of sense of smell with the help of nematodes
PIM kinases are enzymes that are evolutionarily well conserved in both humans and nematodes.
In worms, researchers uncover protein that may one day make opioid use safer
Studying mutant worms has led to the discovery of a receptor that reduces sensitivity to opioid side effects in these organisms.
New study shows how climate change could affect impact of roundworms on grasslands
The researchers found in extreme drought conditions that predator nematodes significantly decreased, which led to the growth of root-feeding nematodes.
Long-lived roundworms helped identify new anti-aging compounds among FDA-approved drugs
Researchers from Gero, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences collaborated to derive a transcriptomic signature of aging, which they confirmed using large transcriptomic databases.
Long-lived roundworms help identify new anti-aging compounds among the FDA approved drugs
Researchers from Gero, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) collaborated to derive a transcriptomic signature of aging, which they confirmed using large transcriptomic databases.
Sussex mathematician's breakthrough on non-toxic pest control
Breakthrough 'gene silencing' technique uses naturally occurring soil bacteria to kill specific crop-destroying pests without harming other insects or the environment.
Peptide keeps predatory nematodes from eating their kin
A small peptide produced in the skin of predatory nematodes prevents them from cannibalizing their immediate family members, while they feed upon their close relatives, a new study finds.
Illinois study identifies a key to soybean cyst nematode growth
The soybean cyst nematode, one of the crop's most destructive pests, isn't like most of its wormy relatives.
More Nematodes News and Nematodes Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.