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Gene drives: Science, ethics, and public engagement

February 17, 2017

Gene drives are a rapidly developing field of research that holds promise for addressing persistent problems, such as eradicating mosquito-borne diseases and conserving endangered species, but that also risks harming entire ecosystems. Gregory E. Kaebnick, PhD, a research scholar at The Hastings Center, is a discussant in Science, Ethics, and Engagement in the Governance of Gene Drives: It Takes a Village, a session that will take place from 3:00 to 4:30 pm on Friday, February 17, room 203, at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston.

Panelists will examine ethical concerns about gene drives and the role of public engagement for developing research and regulatory policies that integrate scientific capabilities with public needs and values. This session builds on a 2016 report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine that reviews the science, ethics, and governance of gene drives. Kaebnick was a member of the committee that produced the report.
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The Hastings Center

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