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EARTH: Revealing potential tsunami inundation on California coast

February 18, 2016

Alexandria, VA - Tsunami hazard maps exist for California coastlines, but recent geological studies indicated some faults may be capable of unleashing more powerful quakes than previously thought. Given this new information, researchers at the University of California Riverside wondered if the current tsunami hazard maps adequately predict inundation zones, or if they need to be updated.

To test their idea, they modeled an earthquake of magnitude 7.7 on the Red Mountain and Pitas Point submarine faults off the coast of Los Angeles. The resulting tsunami behaved predictably when it tracked northward, but to the south the tsunami flooded much farther inland than current projections predict. Read the entire story in the February issue of EARTH Magazine at: http://bit.ly/1SSZZvm.

From humans to hazards geoscience affects every day life and EARTH Magazine continues coverage of these important stories in the February 2016 Issue. Included are feature stories on what actually killed the dinosaurs, and how geoscience is informing how to feed Earth's future populations. There are also updates on research on earthquake and tsunami triggering subduction zones and the origin of land-plants. Participate in regular contests such as the monthly "Where on EARTH" photo hunt, and geoscience-themed puzzles. All this, and more at http://www.earthmagazine.org!
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Keep up to date with the latest happenings in Earth, energy and environment news with EARTH Magazine online at: http://www.earthmagazine.org/. Published by the American Geosciences Institute, EARTH is your source for the science behind the headlines.

The American Geosciences Institute is a nonprofit federation of geoscientific and professional associations that represents more than 250,000 geologists, geophysicists and other earth scientists. Founded in 1948, AGI provides information services to geoscientists, serves as a voice of shared interests in the profession, plays a major role in strengthening geoscience education, and strives to increase public awareness of the vital role the geosciences play in society's use of resources, resiliency to natural hazards, and interaction with the environment.

American Geosciences Institute

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