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Scholar to talk about role of science in law

February 18, 2017

CHICAGO --- Northwestern Pritzker School of Law's Shari Diamond, one of the foremost empirical researchers on jury process and legal decision-making, will address the importance of involving scientists in the legal system at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Boston.

Diamond's presentation, part of the Science and the Law seminar "When the Legal System Seeks Help From Scientists: Successes and Failures," will be held from 8 to 9:30 a.m., Saturday, Feb. 18 in the Hynes Convention Center, Room 302.

The Howard J. Trienens Professor of Law and a research professor at the American Bar Foundation, Diamond will present "Effective Engagement Between Science and the Law." She also will discuss insights from an American Academy of Arts and Sciences study that examines the barriers to effective engagement.

An attorney and social psychologist, Diamond has authored or co-authored more than a hundred publications in law reviews and behavioral science journals. The session focuses on the legal arena of decision-making, where scientific and technological advances have increased the overlap between scientific and legal issues.
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(Source contact: s-diamond@law.northwestern.edu)

Seminar information

"When the Legal System Seeks Help From Scientists: Successes and Failures"
8 to 9:30 a.m., Saturday, February 18
Hynes Convention Center, Room 302

Northwestern University

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