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Certification as a medical home: Does it make a difference in diabetes care?

February 18, 2020

Researchers compared 258 certified medical home primary care practices in Minnesota to 136 non-certified practices, to see if certification had any bearing on performance measures related to the quality of diabetes care. Certified practices were found to have slightly more medical home practice systems than uncertified practices. Additionally, certified practices had somewhat better performance outcomes on quality measures related to diabetes care. Uncertified practices, comprising 39 percent of the surveyed practices, were noted to be more rural but had similar patient populations. Practices certified as medical homes have more systems and improved performance for diabetes care, but the differences are modest.
-end-
Differences in Diabetes Care With and Without Certification as a Medical Home
Leif I. Solberg, MD, et al
HealthPartners Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota
http://www.annfammed.org/content/18/1/66

American Academy of Family Physicians

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