Vaccine shows promise for kidney cancer

February 19, 2004

Results of a phase III study from Germany in this week'ss issue of THE LANCET suggest that a tumour-based vaccine could reduce disease recurrence and increase survival of patients who have had surgery for kidney cancer.

3% of cancer occurs in the kidney, with around 12,000 renal-cancer deaths a year in the USA. Removal of part or all of the kidney (nephrectomy) is the standard treatment for renal cancer, although other treatments after surgery (eg, radiotherapy, chemotherapy) are not effective. Around half of patients with renal cancer will have disease recurrence within 5 years.

Dieter Jocham from the University of Lubeck Medical School, Germany, and colleagues studied 558 patients from 55 medical centres in Germany with a renal tumour scheduled for nephrectomy. Before surgery, all patients were randomised to receive autologous renal tumour cell vaccine (six injections in the upper arm at 4-week intervals after surgery; the vaccine group) or no additional treatment (the control group).

Data were available for 379 patients. 5-year progression-free survival rates were 77% in the vaccine group and 68% in the control group. The vaccine was well tolerated, with only 12 adverse events associated with the treatment. The authors conclude that the vaccine can now be considered for renal cancer patients with tumours larger than 2.5 cm who have undergone nephrectomy.

Referring to Jocham and colleagues' study as an "immunological breakthrough", Mayer Fishman and Scott Antonia from H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, USA, state in an accompanying Commentary (p 583):"[Jocham and colleagues] carefully collected data are part of a broadening base of clinical observations of the potential to affect the biology of a solid tumour with non-toxic readministration of autologous tumour-derived materials. The key milestone is the suggestion of a fixed point-a non-toxic vaccine with a biological clinically relevant effect in T2-3N0 renal cancer-around which innovations can be built. Such a milestone can serve as a concrete step towards making adjuvant treatment of renal cancer a routine and effective intervention."
-end-
Contact:

Dr Dieter Jocham, Department of Urology, University of Lubeck Medical School, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lubeck, Germany. T) 49-451-500-6113; F) 49-451-500-4666; E) prof.jocham.MUL@t-online.de

Dr Mayer Fishman, Department of Interdisciplinary Oncology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, FL 33612, USA; T) 1-813-972-8400 x8200; E) FishmaMN@moffitt.usf.edu

Embargoed 0001 h (London time) 20 February 2004. In North America the embargo for Lancet press material is 6:30pm ET Thursday 19 February 2004.

Lancet

Related Kidney Cancer Articles from Brightsurf:

Reducing urinary protein for patients with rare kidney disease slows kidney decline
New findings show that reducing the amount of protein in the urine of patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis can significantly slow declines in kidney function and extend time before patients' kidneys fail.

Acute kidney injury and end stage kidney disease in severe COVID-19
Many COVID-19 patients experience hematuria, proteinuria and elevated serum creatinine concentration early in the course of the disease.

Cutting off kidney cancer at its roots
Scientists at the MDC have discovered stem cells responsible for the most common form of kidney cancer.

Finding familiar pathways in kidney cancer
The famous cancer gene p53, which was thought to be less relevant in kidney cancer, may play a larger role than previously appreciated, suggesting new potential for treatment.

Root of childhood kidney cancer discovered
A fundamental change in our understanding of the childhood kidney cancer Wilms' tumor is on the horizon, after the discovery of its earliest genetic root by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators.

Kidney-resident macrophages -- a role for healing during acute kidney injury?
Researchers have found that, during acute kidney injury in a mouse model, the kidney-resident macrophages are reprogrammed to a developmental state, resembling these same cells when they are found in newborn mice.

Antibodies to a retina protein to be used as a kidney cancer marker
Sechenov University together with their German colleagues suggest a new highly sensitive, quick, and pain-free method for diagnosing kidney cancer.

Revealed: 35 kidney genes linked to chronic kidney disease risk
An international study lead by University of Manchester scientists has discovered the identity of genes that predispose people to chronic kidney disease.

High-dose, high-precision radiation therapy safe, effective for solitary kidney cancer patients with only one kidney
Treatment of renal cell carcinoma with stereotactic radiation therapy is as safe and effective for patients with one kidney as it is for those who have two, according to an analysis of the largest-ever, international dataset of solitary kidney patients to receive this emerging treatment.

Kidney cancer's developmental source revealed
In the first experiment of its kind, scientists have revealed the precise identity of cancer cells of the most common childhood and adult kidney cancers.

Read More: Kidney Cancer News and Kidney Cancer Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.