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A useful method to diagnose chest pain with foregut symptoms

February 19, 2009

Recent reports have indicated that recurrent chest pain is often a result of esophageal motility disorders or gastroesophageal reflux diseases (GERD), which is known as esophageal chest pain. However, very few studies have been performed about esophageal manometric studies, 24-h intra-esophageal pH monitoring and a Holter electrocardiography for the differential diagnosis of chest pain caused by esophageal dysfunctional and/or myocardial ischemia.

A research team led by Prof. Ru Wen Wang from China addressed this question. Their study will be published on February 14, 2009 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology.

In their study, 61 patients with chest pain and foregut symptoms were included. Thirty-nine patients were diagnosed with non-specific esophageal motility disorders (29 patients with abnormal gastroesophageal reflux and eight patients with myocardial ischemia). Five patients had diffuse spasm of the esophagus plus abnormal gastroesophageal reflux (two patients had concomitant myocardial ischemia), and one patient was diagnosed with nutcracker esophagus.

The study indicated that spasm of the esophageal smooth muscle might cross talk with the heart-coronary smooth muscle, leading to myocardial ischemia. And the combination of esophageal manometric studies, 24-hour intraesophageal pH monitoring and Holter electrocardiography are significant for the differential diagnosis of chest pain, particularly with foregut symptoms. As an added incentive, combined monitoring is very cost-effective to the patients from developing country.
-end-
Reference: Deng B, Wang RW, Jiang YG, Tan QY, Liao XL, Zhou JH, Zhao YP, Gong TQ, Ma Z. Diagnosis of chest pain with foregut symptoms in Chinese patients. World J Gastroenterol 2009;15(6): 742-747

http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/15/742.asp

Correspondence to: Ru-Wen Wang, MD, Thoracic Surgery Department, Institute of Surgery Research, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042, China. superdb@163.com

About World Journal of Gastroenterology

World Journal of Gastroenterology (WJG), a leading international journal in gastroenterology and hepatology, has established a reputation for publishing first class research on esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, viral hepatitis, colorectal cancer, and H. pylori infection and provides a forum for both clinicians and scientists. WJG has been indexed and abstracted in Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, Science Citation Index Expanded (also known as SciSearch) and Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition, Index Medicus, MEDLINE and PubMed, Chemical Abstracts, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, Abstracts Journals, Nature Clinical Practice Gastroenterology and Hepatology, CAB Abstracts and Global Health. ISI JCR 2003-2000 IF: 3.318, 2.532, 1.445 and 0.993. WJG is a weekly journal published by WJG Press. The publication dates are the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th day of every month. WJG is supported by The National Natural Science Foundation of China, No. 30224801 and No. 30424812, and was founded with the name of China National Journal of New Gastroenterology on October 1, 1995, and renamed WJG on January 25, 1998.

About The WJG Press

The WJG Press mainly publishes World Journal of Gastroenterology.

World Journal of Gastroenterology

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