Nav: Home

Birch pollen allergen immunotherapy normalizes nasal gene-expression and microbial community

February 19, 2019

Birch pollen allergic rhinitis is the most common chronic disorder in the Northern part of the globe, and it attributes to significant morbidity and economic burden.

According to the new study by researchers at the University of Helsinki, pollen allergen immunotherapy has favorable effects on the molecular events and microbiome profile in the nasal membrane.

The researchers studied five healthy, nonsmoking adult subjects and six allergic rhinitis patients longitudinally during two springs and two winters in 2011 and 2012. Half of the allergy patients started subcutaneous birch allergen immunotherapy after the first winter.

In total, 44 nasal brushings were subjected to RNA-sequencing analysis to find gene expression and microbial community changes driven by allergic rhinitis and allergen immunotherapy.

According to the results, the group who started allergen immunotherapy showed decreased symptom score and reprogramming of nasal epithelial transcriptome, set of RNA molecules, during the pollen season.

"The immunotherapy affected asthma-, chemokine signaling-, and toll like receptor signaling pathways in the spring. No major differential expression was found between the two winters in any group," says researcher Sanna Toppila-Salmi from the University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital.

The results also indicated that microbial community diversity of the group that underwent allergen immunotherapy approached that of the healthy controls.

According to the researchers, the study shows that RNA sequencing is a promising method to monitor allergen immunotherapy response.
-end-


University of Helsinki

Related Rna Articles:

How RNA formed at the origins of life
A single process for how a group of molecules called nucleotides were made on the early Earth, before life began, has been suggested by a UCL-led team of researchers.
RNA and longevity: Discovering the mechanisms behind aging
Korean researchers suggests that NMD-mediated RNA quality control is critical for longevity in the roundworm called C. elegans, a popularly used animal for aging research.
Don't kill the messenger RNA
Success of new protein-making therapy for hemophilia opens door for treating many other diseases.
RNA modification important for brain function
Researchers at the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB) and Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have shown that a new way of regulating genes is vital for the activity of the nervous system.
Atlas of the RNA universe takes shape
In the last few years, small snippets of RNA, which may have played a key role in the planet's earliest flickering of life, have been uncovered and examined in great detail.
Punching cancer with RNA knuckles
Researchers achieved an unexpected eye-popping reduction of ovarian cancer during successful tests of targeted nanohydrogel delivery in vivo in mice.
Gatekeeping proteins to aberrant RNA: You shall not pass
Berkeley Lab researchers found that aberrant strands of genetic code have telltale signs that enable gateway proteins to recognize and block them from exiting the nucleus.
Short RNA molecules mapped in single cell
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have measured the absolute numbers of short, non-coding, RNA sequences in individual embryonic stem cells.
Watching RNA fold
New technology takes a nucleotide-resolution snapshot of RNA as it is folding, which could lead to discoveries in biology, gene expression, and disease.
Bacteria: Third RNA binding protein identified
Pathogenic bacteria use small RNA molecules to adapt to their environment.

Related Rna Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Changing The World
What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, "craftivist" Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#521 The Curious Life of Krill
Krill may be one of the most abundant forms of life on our planet... but it turns out we don't know that much about them. For a create that underpins a massive ocean ecosystem and lives in our oceans in massive numbers, they're surprisingly difficult to study. We sit down and shine some light on these underappreciated crustaceans with Stephen Nicol, Adjunct Professor at the University of Tasmania, Scientific Advisor to the Association of Responsible Krill Harvesting Companies, and author of the book "The Curious Life of Krill: A Conservation Story from the Bottom of the World".