Psychiatry And The Media Consensus Conference

February 19, 1998

Cosponsored by the American Psychiatric Association and Program in Medical Journalism at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

An opportunity to explore and determine consensus among the media and psychiatry on controversial psychiatric issues in today's news, including use and misuse of psychiatric diagnosis, St. John's Wort and other herbal remedies, psychopharmaceutical advertising, and confidentiality of psychiatric medical records.

Attendance limited; travel and lodging stipends available. For more inforamtion, contact Melissa Saunders-Katz at APA, (202) 682-6142.
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American Psychiatric Association

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