Men in their 50s have more satisfying sex lives than men in their 30s

February 20, 2006

Men in their fifties are more satisfied with their sex lives than men in their thirties and forties, recording similar levels to 20-29 year-olds, according to a survey published in the February issue of BJU International.

A team of experts from Norway and the USA surveyed 1,185 men aged between 20 and 79, asking them about various aspects of their sex life, including drive, erections and ejaculation.

They found that although there was a strong relationship between a man's advancing age and his declining sex drive and ability to have an erection and ejaculate, there wasn't such a strong link between age and overall sexual satisfaction.

The men who responded to the Norwegian postal questionnaire were asked to rate their satisfaction with various aspects of their sex life on a scale of zero to four, with four representing good sexual function and no problems. Men in their twenties recorded an average overall satisfaction level of 2.79 and the second highest level was among fifty-somethings who recorded an average of 2.77. Men in their 30s only reached 2.55 and men in their forties averaged 2.72.

After the age of 59, overall satisfaction fell significantly to 2.46 for men in their sixties and 2.14 for men in their seventies.

However when it came to sexual function, each of the scores moved steadily downwards toward zero as the respondents got older, indicating lower levels of function and more problems:Other findings included:"The survey was carried out using a questionnaire first developed and tested in American in 1995" says co-author Professor Sophie D Fossa from the Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet Trust in Oslo, who carried out the research with colleagues from the University of Oslo, the University of Bergen and Harvard Medical School in the USA.

"The results showed a very strong correlation between men getting older and reduced sexual functioning, but not between age and sexual satisfaction" she points out.

"Age accounted for a 22 per cent variance in sexual drive, a 33 per cent variance in erection issues and a 23 per cent variance in ejaculation issues.

"But age only accounted for a variance of three per cent in overall satisfaction.

"Our results show that although men experience more problems and less sexual function as they get older, it doesn't necessarily follow that they are less satisfied with their sex lives as a result."
-end-
Notes to editors
Assessment of male sexual function by the Brief Sexual Function Inventory. Mykletun, Dahl, O'Leary and Fossa. Norway / USA. BJU International. Volume 97, pages 316 to 323. (February 2006).

Established in 1929, BJU International is published 12 times a year by Blackwell Publishing and edited by Professor John Fitzpatrick from University College Dublin, Ireland. It provides its international readership with invaluable practical information on all aspects of urology, including original and investigative articles and illustrated surgery. www.bjui.org

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Related High Blood Pressure Articles from Brightsurf:

High blood pressure linked to baroreflex in rats
Researchers describe a newly observed phenomenon in the way blood pressure is maintained in certain rats.

Children who take steroids at increased risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, blood clots
Children who take oral steroids to treat asthma or autoimmune diseases have an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and blood clots, according to Rutgers researchers.

High blood pressure treatment linked to less risk for drop in blood pressure upon standing
Treatment to lower blood pressure did not increase and may decrease the risk of extreme drops in blood pressure upon standing from a sitting position.

Changes in blood pressure control over 2 decades among US adults with high blood pressure
National survey data were used to examine how blood pressure control changed overall among U.S. adults with high blood pressure between 1999-2000 and 2017-2018 and by age, race, insurance type and access to health care.

Wealthier men are more likely to develop high blood pressure
Working men with higher incomes are more likely to develop high blood pressure, reports a study presented at the 84th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society (JCS 2020).

Regular exercise helps prevent high blood pressure, even in areas of high air pollution
Regular physical activity is a healthy way to prevent and reduce high blood pressure, even in places where pollution levels are relatively high.

Could high blood pressure at night have an effect on your brain?
Most people's blood pressure 'dips' during the night. But for some people, especially those with high blood pressure, their nighttime pressure stays the same or goes up, called 'reverse dipping.' A new study shows that these people may be more likely to have small areas in the brain that appear damaged from vascular disease and associated memory problems.

All women should be educated after childbirth about high blood pressure
After childbirth, it is not uncommon for women to experience high blood pressure.

Brain blood flow sensor discovery could aid treatments for high blood pressure & dementia
A study led by researchers at UCL has discovered the mechanism that allows the brain to monitor its own blood supply, a finding in rats which may help to find new treatments for human conditions including hypertension (high blood pressure) and dementia.

New strategy for treating high blood pressure
The key to treating blood pressure might lie in people who are 'resistant' to developing high blood pressure even when they eat high salt diets, shows new research published today in Experimental Physiology.

Read More: High Blood Pressure News and High Blood Pressure Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.