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Half of transgender youth avoid disclosing gender identity to a health care provider

February 20, 2020

PITTSBURGH, Feb. 20, 2020 - Researchers at UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh surveyed patients in a local clinic providing gender-affirming care to transgender youth and found that a surprisingly high number of them intentionally avoided disclosing their gender identity to doctors outside the clinic.

The paper was published today in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

"The provider-patient power dynamic is a real one," said lead author Gina Sequeira, M.D., M.S., adolescent medicine fellow at UPMC Children's Hospital. "It's important for us as providers to open the door and ask young people in a respectful and open way if they would like to talk about their identity."

When providers know that a young patient is transgender, they're in a better position to ensure access to services, from medical transition to mental health, Sequeira said.

During the summer and fall of 2018, she analyzed survey responses from 153 transgender youth ages 12-26 years old. Two-thirds identified as male, one-fifth as female and another fifth as nonbinary.

While 78% of the participants reported disclosing their gender identity to a health care provider outside the clinic at least once, 47% reported intentionally avoiding disclosure, even in situations where they thought it might be important for their health.

The most common reasons cited for withholding gender identity were feeling uncomfortable and not knowing how to bring it up, with only 25% saying they preferred to be the ones to broach the topic.

Instead, participants suggested multiple ways clinics can create spaces to help young patients feel more comfortable disclosing their gender identities, including transgender-friendly materials in the waiting room, forms that include a checkbox for gender identity and educating staff about using a patient's preferred name and pronouns.

It's important to note that the gender clinic where participants were recruited requires parent or guardian consent for treatment of minors -- a group that makes up half of the total study sample -- meaning these youth are "out" at home and often have at least one supportive caregiver in their lives.

Given that sampling bias, Sequeira was surprised to see so many participants avoiding disclosure.

"I suspect if we looked in a non-clinical sample, that number would be much higher," Sequeira said. "Our patients have already overcome many barriers."

Sequeira is expanding the study to sample a larger, more general population of transgender youth through social media.
-end-
Additional authors on the study include Kristin Ray, M.D., M.S., of Pitt; Elizabeth Miller, M.D., Ph.D., of Pitt and UPMC Children's Hospital; and Robert Coulter, Ph.D., M.P.H., of the Pitt Graduate School of Public Health.

This work was funded by the National Institutes of Health (T32 HD71834-5 and T32 HD087162), National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (TL1TR001858) and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (K01AA027564).

To read this release online or share it, visit https://www.upmc.com/media/news/022020-sequeira-trans-disclosure [when embargo lifts].

About UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh

Regionally, nationally, and globally, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh is a leader in the treatment of childhood conditions and diseases, a pioneer in the development of new and improved therapies, and a top educator of the next generation of pediatricians and pediatric subspecialists. With generous community support, UPMC Children's Hospital has fulfilled this mission since its founding in 1890. UPMC Children's is recognized consistently for its clinical, research, educational, and advocacy-related accomplishments, including ranking in the top 10 on the 2019-2020 U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll of America's Best Children's Hospitals. UPMC Children's also ranks 15th among children's hospitals and schools of medicine in funding for pediatric research provided by the National Institutes of Health (FY2018).

About the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

The University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences include the schools of Medicine, Nursing, Dental Medicine, Pharmacy, Health and Rehabilitation Sciences and the Graduate School of Public Health. The schools serve as the academic partner to the UPMC (University of Pittsburgh Medical Center). Together, their combined mission is to train tomorrow's health care specialists and biomedical scientists, engage in groundbreaking research that will advance understanding of the causes and treatments of disease and participate in the delivery of outstanding patient care. Since 1998, Pitt and its affiliated university faculty have ranked among the top 10 educational institutions in grant support from the National Institutes of Health. For additional information about the Schools of the Health Sciences, please visit http://www.health.pitt.edu.

http://www.upmc.com/media

Contact: Erin Hare
Office: 412-864-7194
Mobile: 412-738-1097
E-mail: HareE@upmc.edu

Contact: Andrea Kunicky
Office: 412-692-6254
Mobile: 412-552-7448
E-mail: KunickyA@upmc.edu

University of Pittsburgh

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