Nav: Home

Prostate cancer cells grow with malfunction of cholesterol control in cells

February 21, 2017

DURHAM, N.C. - Advanced prostate cancer and high blood cholesterol have long been known to be connected, but it has been a chicken-or-egg problem.

Now a team led by researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute have identified a cellular process that cancer cells hijack to hoard cholesterol and fuel their growth. Identifying this process could inform the development of better ways to control cholesterol accumulation in tumors, potentially leading to improved survival for prostate cancer patients.

The findings are published online this month in the journal Cancer Research.

"Prostate cancer cells, as well as some other solid tumors, have been shown to contain higher cholesterol levels than normal cells," said senior author Donald McDonnell, Ph.D., chairman of the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke. "All cells need cholesterol to grow, and too much of it can stimulate uncontrolled growth.

"Prostate cancer cells somehow bypass the cellular control switch that regulates the levels of cholesterol allowing them to accumulate this fat," McDonnell said. "This process has not been well understood. In this study, we show how prostate cancer cells accomplish this."

McDonnell and colleagues began by identifying genes involved in cholesterol regulation in prostate tumors. They homed in on a specific gene, CYP27A1, which is a key component of the machinery that governs the level of cholesterol within cells.

In patients with prostate cancer, the expression of the CYP27A1 gene in tumors is significantly lower, and this is especially true for men with aggressive cancers compared to the tumors in men with more benign disease. Downregulation of this gene basically shuts off the sensor that cells use to gauge when they have taken up enough cholesterol. This in turn allows accumulation of this fat in tumor cells. Access to more cholesterol gives prostate cancer cells a selective growth advantage.

"It remains to be determined how this regulatory activity can be restored and/or whether it's possible to mitigate the effects of the increased cholesterol uptake that result from the loss of CYP27A1 expression," McDonnell said.

He said statin use alone might help, but perhaps not enough, since tumors could simply rev up the regulation of the cholesterol manufacturing process in tumors to compensate.

McDonnell said is lab is continuing the research, including finding ways to induce cells to eject cholesterol, reverse the inhibition of CYP27A1 activity, or introduce compounds that interfere with cholesterol-production in the tumor.
-end-
In addition to McDonnell, study authors include Mahmoud A. Alfaqih, Erik R. Nelson, Wen Liu, Rachid Safi, Jeffery S. Jasper, Everardo Macias, Joseph Geradts, J. Will Thompson, Laura G. Dubois, Michael R. Freeman, Ching-yi Chang, Jen-Tsan Chi, and Stephen J. Freedland.

This work received funding from the National Institutes of Health (R01DK048807, R00CA172357, 3R01-CA125618-08S1, CA131235 and 5K24CA160653-03); The Stewart Rahr Prostate Cancer Foundation Young Investigator Award and the Department of Defense (W81XWH-12-1-0102).

Duke University Medical Center

Related Prostate Cancer Articles:

First prostate cancer therapy to target genes delays cancer progression
For the first time, prostate cancer has been treated based on the genetic makeup of the cancer, resulting in delayed disease progression, delayed time to pain progression, and potentially extending lives in patients with advanced, metastatic prostate cancer, reports a large phase 3 trial.
Men taking medications for enlarged prostate face delays in prostate cancer diagnosis
University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers report that men treated with medications for benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate) experienced a two-year delay in diagnosis of their prostate cancer and were twice as likely to have advanced disease upon diagnosis.
CNIO researchers confirm links between aggressive prostate cancer and hereditary breast cancer
The study has potential implications for families with members suffering from these types of tumours who are at an increased risk of developing cancer.
Distinguishing fatal prostate cancer from 'manageable' cancer now possible
Scientists at the University of York have found a way of distinguishing between fatal prostate cancer and manageable cancer, which could reduce unnecessary surgeries and radiotherapy.
Researchers find prostate cancer drug byproduct can fuel cancer cells
A genetic anomaly in certain men with prostate cancer may impact their response to common drugs used to treat the disease, according to new research at Cleveland Clinic.
ASCO and Cancer Care Ontario update guideline on radiation therapy for prostate cancer
The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and Cancer Care Ontario today issued a joint clinical practice guideline update on brachytherapy (internal radiation) for patients with prostate cancer.
Patient prostate tissue used to create unique model of prostate cancer biology
For the first time, researchers have been able to grow, in a lab, both normal and primary cancerous prostate cells from a patient, and then implant a million of the cancer cells into a mouse to track how the tumor progresses.
Moffitt Cancer Center awarded $3.2 million grant to study bone metastasis in prostate cancer
Moffitt researchers David Basanta, Ph.D., and Conor Lynch, Ph.D., have been awarded a U01 grant to investigate prostate cancer metastasis.
Prostate cancer discovery may make it easier to kill cancer cells
A newly discovered connection between two common prostate cancer treatments may soon make prostate cancer cells easier to destroy.
New test for prostate cancer significantly improves prostate cancer screening
A study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that a new test for prostate cancer is better at detecting aggressive cancer than PSA.
More Prostate Cancer News and Prostate Cancer Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Accessing Better Health
Essential health care is a right, not a privilege ... or is it? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can give everyone access to a healthier way of life, despite who you are or where you live. Guests include physician Raj Panjabi, former NYC health commissioner Mary Bassett, researcher Michael Hendryx, and neuroscientist Rachel Wurzman.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#544 Prosperity Without Growth
The societies we live in are organised around growth, objects, and driving forward a constantly expanding economy as benchmarks of success and prosperity. But this growing consumption at all costs is at odds with our understanding of what our planet can support. How do we lower the environmental impact of economic activity? How do we redefine success and prosperity separate from GDP, which politicians and governments have focused on for decades? We speak with ecological economist Tim Jackson, Professor of Sustainable Development at the University of Surrey, Director of the Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Propserity, and author of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab