Learning about coronary heart disease from women

February 21, 2018

Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the number one cause of death in both men and women. While many risk factors of CHD, such as smoking, high blood pressure and age, are common among men and women, some metabolic risk factors, such as being diabetic, are more strongly associated with increased risk of CHD in women than in men. Even though metabolic risk factors seem to be stronger in women, few studies have sought metabolic markers - that is, measurable indicators that can be detected in blood samples - of CHD in women. A new study by Brigham and Women's Hospital researchers recently addressed this gap, uncovering a new biomarker for CHD. Their results are published in Circulation.

"We were particularly interested in analyzing samples from women to understand some of the mechanisms underlying these risks," said corresponding author Nina P. Paynter, PhD, of the Department of Medicine at BWH. "We found a set of oxidized lipids that are novel markers for CHD, representing a different pathway contributing to CHD than the pathways we have previously considered."

By comparing the metabolic profiles of women with CHD and a control group of women, the researchers were able to identify one particular oxidized lipid as the strongest new risk marker for CHD. These results were replicated in a separate cohort of both men and women. Women in the highest quartile of the marker had a 4-fold higher risk of developing CHD in the next several years.

This marker is not associated with traditional risk markers, such as cholesterol levels and hypertension, suggesting that it contributes to CHD through a different pathway than the classical risk prediction markers. The exact mechanisms by which the identified oxidized lipid is contributing to CHD is unknown, and the researchers hope that future work will help to uncover how this risk marker is involved with CHD on a molecular level.

"Part of the reason that our study is so exciting is because it highlights that by focusing on specific patient groups, such as women, that have been historically underrepresented in these sort of studies, we are able to uncover new mechanisms may contribute to disease in the entire population," said senior author Kathryn M. Rexrode, MD, MPH, Chief of the Division of Women's Health of the Department of Medicine at BWH.
-end-


Brigham and Women's Hospital

Related High Blood Pressure Articles from Brightsurf:

High blood pressure linked to baroreflex in rats
Researchers describe a newly observed phenomenon in the way blood pressure is maintained in certain rats.

Children who take steroids at increased risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, blood clots
Children who take oral steroids to treat asthma or autoimmune diseases have an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and blood clots, according to Rutgers researchers.

High blood pressure treatment linked to less risk for drop in blood pressure upon standing
Treatment to lower blood pressure did not increase and may decrease the risk of extreme drops in blood pressure upon standing from a sitting position.

Changes in blood pressure control over 2 decades among US adults with high blood pressure
National survey data were used to examine how blood pressure control changed overall among U.S. adults with high blood pressure between 1999-2000 and 2017-2018 and by age, race, insurance type and access to health care.

Wealthier men are more likely to develop high blood pressure
Working men with higher incomes are more likely to develop high blood pressure, reports a study presented at the 84th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society (JCS 2020).

Regular exercise helps prevent high blood pressure, even in areas of high air pollution
Regular physical activity is a healthy way to prevent and reduce high blood pressure, even in places where pollution levels are relatively high.

Could high blood pressure at night have an effect on your brain?
Most people's blood pressure 'dips' during the night. But for some people, especially those with high blood pressure, their nighttime pressure stays the same or goes up, called 'reverse dipping.' A new study shows that these people may be more likely to have small areas in the brain that appear damaged from vascular disease and associated memory problems.

All women should be educated after childbirth about high blood pressure
After childbirth, it is not uncommon for women to experience high blood pressure.

Brain blood flow sensor discovery could aid treatments for high blood pressure & dementia
A study led by researchers at UCL has discovered the mechanism that allows the brain to monitor its own blood supply, a finding in rats which may help to find new treatments for human conditions including hypertension (high blood pressure) and dementia.

New strategy for treating high blood pressure
The key to treating blood pressure might lie in people who are 'resistant' to developing high blood pressure even when they eat high salt diets, shows new research published today in Experimental Physiology.

Read More: High Blood Pressure News and High Blood Pressure Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.