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Health burden of glaucoma has risen worldwide

February 21, 2019

The health burden of glaucoma has continuously increased around the globe in the past 25 years, according to an Acta Opthalmologica study.

Higher burdens were associated with lower socioeconomic level and older age. In addition, being female and being exposed to higher ambient ultraviolet radiation and higher levels of air pollution were significantly associated with a higher burden of glaucoma.

The results come from an analysis of information from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015, which provides data on the health burdens of 315 diseases and injuries across 196 countries/territories from 1980 to 2015.

"Global glaucoma burden did not improve dramatically, indicating the need for persistent investment, educational campaign, and early screening for tackling glaucoma," said senior author Dr. Wenyong Huang, of Sun Yat-sen University, in China.
-end-


Wiley

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