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Can mixing household cleaners kill you? (video)

February 21, 2019

WASHINGTON, Feb. 21, 2019 -- When the bathroom starts looking grimy, and it's time to whip out yellow gloves, the only thing that matters is getting the job done quickly. So you open the cabinet, see a bunch of bottles and think, "Hey, this cleans, and that cleans, so why not mix them all together? That'll kill dirt and grime even faster!" Think again -- your all-purpose cleaning cocktail could turn a bad day even worse. Can death by toilet-bowl cleaning really happen? Today on Reactions, you're about to find out: https://youtu.be/FH1h0oWjark.
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