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New strategy improves efficiency of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing

February 21, 2019

New Rochelle, NY, February 21, 2019--The efficiency of CRISPR genome editing tools targeted to the site of interest by Cas9 nucleases varies considerably and a new CMP-fusion strategy, called CRISPR-chrom, enhances the activity up to several-fold. CRISPR-chrom works by fusing a Cas9 to chromatin-modulating peptides (CMPs), as described in an article published in The CRISPR Journal, a new peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free on The CRISPR Journal website through March 7, 2019.

In the article entitled "Improving CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Editing Efficiency by Fusion with Chromatin-Modulating Peptides," Fuqiang Chen and a team of researchers from MilliporeSigma (St. Louis, MO) report on the methods they used to modify Cas9 with peptides known to interact naturally with chromatin, the DNA/RNA/protein complex that comprises chromosomes. The researchers demonstrate a substantial increase in CRISPR-Cas9 activity with the CRISPR-chrom strategy, especially on previously difficult to target sites. They also reported no notable increase in off-target effects. The authors also provided proof of concept for this approach using Cas9 proteins orthogonal to the popular SpyCas9, further expanding the CRISPR toolkit and opening new opportunities for multiplexing as well.

"This is a noteworthy technical improvement for an enhanced CRISPR toolbox," says Rodolphe Barrangou, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of The CRISPR Journal. "This approach enhances the editing outcome at refractory sites, and CRISPR-chrom in combination with enhanced guide scaffolds increase our ability to flexibly target the genome."
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About the Journal

The CRISPR Journal is a groundbreaking peer-reviewed journal dedicated to outstanding research and commentary on all aspects of CRISPR and gene editing research. Published bimonthly in print and online and led by Editor-in-Chief Rodolphe Barrangou, PhD, North Carolina State University, the Journal covers CRISPR biology, technology and genome editing, and commentary and debate of key policy, regulatory, and ethical issues affecting the field. For complete information and a sample issue, please visit The CRISPR Journal website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Human Gene Therapy, ASSAY and Drug Development Technologies, Nucleic Acid Therapeutics, Stem Cells and Development, and Biopreservation and Biobanking. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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