Natural (born) killers: What do they really do?

February 22, 2011

Our immune systems contain three fundamentally different types of cell: B-cells, T-cells and the mysteriously named Natural Killer cells (NK cells), which are known to be involved in killing tumour cells and other infected cells. Experiments to investigate the function of NK cells have proven difficult to interpret because the interactions between the various components of the immune system make it almost impossible to isolate effects of individual cell types. This has changed with the development of a mouse in which individual genes can be knocked out (eliminated) only in NK cells, thereby providing scientists with a tool to study the importance of NK cells and indeed of individual pathways in these cells. The mouse was generated in the group of Veronika Sexl, who has recently moved from the Medical University of Vienna to the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna. An initial characterization is presented in the current issue of the journal Blood.

The development of a tool alone would not normally generate headlines but this case is different: the new mouse can be used to knock out any gene completely and exclusively in NK cells. It thus permits researchers to examine the functions of NK cells in the entire organism or even to investigate the importance of individual genes in this particular cell-type.

Sexl herself has naturally used the tool already. She has been able to show that a particular transcription factor known as Stat5 is essential for the correct development of NK cells - when this factor is eliminated, the cells fail to develop properly. The upshot is a mouse with an immune system that lacks NK cells but is otherwise fully intact. This is the first time it has proven possible to remove this particular cell type without affecting the rest of the animal. Finally, then, it is possible to learn what NK cells actually do in the intact organism.

Sexl and her collaborators have shown that mice lacking NK cells have normal T-cell responses to tumours, although their NK cell-mediated responses are naturally dramatically reduced. This experiment proves conclusively that the mouse can be used to untangle the web of interactions among the various cells of the immune system.

Sexl's work has immediate implications for the treatment of cancer in humans. As an example, leukemia is sometimes treated by inhibiting the STAT5 protein. Sexl's findings make it clear that this approach has a real drawback: inhibition of STAT5 will lead to a drop in the number of NK cells and so interfere with one of the body's own mechanisms for fighting the cancer. It will be important to assess whether NK cells normally play a part in fighting diseases before inhibiting STAT5. For the first time, the newly developed mouse provides a tool to do so. Not surprisingly, it is already attracting a great deal of interest - as Sexl says, "They've been going like hot cakes ever since the word got out."
-end-
The paper A novel Ncr1-Cre mouse reveals the essential role of STAT5 for NK cell survival and development by Eva Eckelhart, Wolfgang Warsch, Eva Zebedin, Olivia Simma, Dagmar Stoiber, Thomas Kolbe, Thomas Rülicke, Mathias Mueller, Emilio Casanova and Veronika Sexl is published in the journal Blood (3 February 2011, Vol. 117, pp. 1565-1573).

Although Sexl has only just joined the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna she has had a long association with the University and her recent work was performed in close collaboration with a number of its scientists as well as with the group of Emilio Casanova at the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Cancer Research, Vienna.

The work was co-funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) and undertaken in the framework of the Special Research Programme (SFB) "Jak-Stat-Signalling from Basics to Disease", hosted by the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna. http://www.jak-stat.at

About the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna

The University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna is the only academic and research institution in Austria that focusses on the veterinary sciences. About 1000 employees and 2300 students work on the campus in the north of Vienna, which also houses the animal hospital and various spin-off-companies. http://www.vetmeduni.ac.at

Scientific contact: Prof Veronika Sexl, E veronika.sexl@vetmeduni.ac.at, T +43 1 25077-2901

Released by: Klaus Wassermann, E klaus.wassermann@vetmeduni.ac.at, Tel. +43 1 25077-1151

University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

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