IIVS awarded grant to develop non-animal testing strategy for respiratory sensitization

February 22, 2016

GAITHERSBURG, MD - February 22, 2016 - The Institute for In Vitro Sciences, Inc. (IIVS) has received a grant from the Research Institute for Fragrance Materials (RIFM) to develop non-animal test methods for the evaluation of fragrance materials for potential respiratory irritation and sensitization.

The grant was secured in collaboration with Liverpool John Moores University and the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. The proposal, "The use of a novel non-animal platform to characterize respiratory effects of fragrance materials" combines computational approaches as well as in chemico techniques, and includes a testing plan in harmony with concepts for the OECD Adverse Outcome Pathway program.

"The ability to evaluate the effect of fragrance materials on the respiratory system is significant for many industries. This project is expected to deliver far-reaching benefits to the scientific community for evaluating respiratory irritation and sensitization," said Dr. Holger Behrsing, Principal Scientist at IIVS and Primary Investigator on the project. "We are pleased that RIFM has chosen to promote the use of a non-animal approach for this investigation."

"The generation and distribution of high quality scientific data on the safety assessment of fragrances is central to our mission," said Dr. James Romine, President at RIFM. "RIFM is committed to the development of these data utilizing state-of-the-art technologies which don't require the use of animals."
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About IIVS

IIVS is a non-profit organization wholly dedicated to the promotion of rapid and innovative non-animal test methods. Founded in 1997, IIVS is recognized as a leading provider of in vitro testing in support of toxicological safety evaluations. Rigorous scientific programs coupled with educational and outreach initiatives have established IIVS as a global leader in the advancement of alternatives to animal testing. For more information, visit http://www.iivs.org.

About RIFM

Established in 1966, RIFM is the international scientific authority for the safe use of fragrance materials. RIFM generates, evaluates and distributes scientific data on the safety assessment of fragrance raw materials found in personal and household care products. Through extensive research, testing and constant monitoring of all scientific literature available, RIFM maintains its Database as the most comprehensive source worldwide of physical-chemical, toxicological and eco-toxicological data associated with known fragrance and flavor materials. RIFM's scientific findings are evaluated by an independent Expert Panel--an international group of dermatologists, pathologists, toxicologists, reproduction, respiratory and environmental scientists. The Expert Panel evaluates the safety of fragrance ingredients under conditions of intended use and publishes its results in peer-reviewed scientific journals. The decisions of the Expert Panel regarding restrictions of use are published as IFRA Standards. For more information about RIFM, visit http://www.rifm.org or e-mail rifm@rifm.org.

Institute for In Vitro Sciences

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