Two Johns Hopkins researchers win Presidential Early Career Awards

February 22, 2016

Namandje Bumpus, Ph.D., and Jordan Green, Ph.D., of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine are among 105 winners of Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, which were announced by the White House on Feb. 18. The awards recognize young researchers who are employed or funded by federal agencies "whose early accomplishments show the greatest promise for assuring America's pre-eminence in science and engineering and contributing to the awarding agencies' missions," according to a White House statement.

"These early-career scientists are leading the way in our efforts to confront and understand challenges from climate change to our health and wellness," President Barack Obama said in the statement. "We congratulate these accomplished individuals and encourage them to continue to serve as an example of the incredible promise and ingenuity of the American people."

Bumpus, an associate professor of medicine and of pharmacology and molecular sciences, also serves as the school of medicine's associate dean for institutional and student equity. Her research focuses on how the body processes HIV medications, converting them into different molecules, and the actions of those molecules. In recent studies, she has found genetic differences in how people process popular HIV drugs, suggesting genetic testing should have a greater role to play in combating the virus. "Since joining Johns Hopkins in 2010, Namandje has made tremendous progress toward ultimately making HIV treatment more personalized and effective," says Mark Anderson, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Department of Medicine. "This is a well-deserved recognition of her work, and I look forward to seeing how she will continue to advance the field."

Green, an associate professor of biomedical engineering, neurosurgery, oncology and ophthalmology, and a member of the Institute for NanoBioTechnology, was named one of Popular Science's Brilliant Ten in 2014. He develops nanoparticles that could potentially deliver therapeutics to the precise place in the body where they're needed -- to make tumor cells self-destruct, for example, while leaving healthy cells intact. "Jordan's innovations and productivity are exceptional, and his findings have very exciting implications for patients," says Leslie Tung, Ph.D., interim director of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. "He is truly an extraordinary and exemplary early-career scientist, and a wonderful colleague as well."

The 105 award winners will be recognized at a White House ceremony this spring.
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Johns Hopkins Medicine

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