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Researchers find association between gum disease and ischemic stroke risk

February 22, 2017

Adults with gum, or periodontal, disease may be at greater ischemic stroke risk, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2017.

Researchers assessed 6,711 adults, who had not had a stroke, for periodontal disease and categorized the adults according to whether they had mild, moderate or severe periodontal disease. They followed patients for 15 years for the incidence of stroke, also documenting the stroke subtype based on cause.

A total of 299 ischemic strokes occurred during the 15 years, including 47 percent that were thrombotic stroke, from a clot within the brain's blood vessels; 26 percent that were cardioembolic, when a blood clot forms in the heart; and 20 percent that were lacunar strokes, which occurs when there is a blockage of small arteries that supply blood to the brain.

They found:

Participants with mild periodontal disease were 1.9 times more likely to have an ischemic stroke than those without periodontal disease. Those with moderate periodontal disease had 2.1 times higher ischemic stroke risk and adults with severe gum disease were 2.2 times more likely to suffer an ischemic stroke than those who had no periodontal disease.

The association between increasing levels of periodontal disease and stroke risk was most pronounced in the cardioembolic and thrombotic stroke subtypes.

The graded association between the level of gum disease and incident ischemic stroke, supports a possible causal association between gum disease and ischemic stroke, researchers said.
-end-
Souvik Sen, M.D., M.S., M.P.H., Professor and Chair of Neurology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina.

Note: Actual presentation is 6:15 p.m. CT/7:15 p.m. ET, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017 in Hall E.

For more research on dental care and stroke SEE ALSO Session MP19 - Poster TMP107 "Regular dental care reduces the risk for ischemic stroke: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study, embargoed for 3 p.m. CT/4 p.m. ET, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017.

Note: Actual presentation is 6 p.m. CT/7 p.m. ET, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017 in Hall E.

Additional Resources:

Any available multimedia related to these tips are on the right column of this link http://newsroom.heart.org/news/isc17-wednesday-news-tips?preview=aab5f2aaec95dba7de22a885be76aea2
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Follow news from the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2017 via Twitter: @HeartNews #ISC17. Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Stroke Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

American Heart Association

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