Nav: Home

CancerLinQ partners with premier radiation oncology society

February 22, 2017

ALEXANDRIA, Va., February 22, 2017 - CancerLinQ LLC and the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) are partnering to bring radiation oncology expertise to CancerLinQ and improve the care of cancer patients nationwide. ASTRO will provide guidance for the development of the CancerLinQ platform to ensure that the system captures more relevant patient data to drive actionable decision-making in cancer care, as well as to advance public policy and population health issues. ASTRO also will use insights from CancerLinQ Discovery to improve the care of patients receiving radiation therapy.

Between half and two-thirds of all cancer patients receive radiation therapy, also known as radiotherapy, to cure cancer, control its spread and relieve symptoms such as pain. At present, however, important details about radiation dose and treatment schedule are often absent from the electronic health record systems used in many oncology practices. Through the partnership, experts will develop specialized indicators for radiation-related treatment outcomes and quality that can be incorporated into the CancerLinQ platform. Inclusion of these metrics will provide a much more complete and accurate characterization of the cancer care that patients are receiving, particularly for the many situations where radiation and chemotherapy are combined.

"The addition of the nation's radiation oncologists is essential to ensuring CancerLinQ's capacity to improve patient care and can help both organizations achieve outcomes that are larger and more impactful than what either one could have achieved alone," said Kevin Fitzpatrick, Chief Executive Officer of CancerLinQ LLC. "With ASTRO, we are bringing the expertise of the nation's leading physicians who specialize in treating more than one million patients each year with radiation therapy."

The partnership reflects CancerLinQ's goal to create a system that encompasses all of cancer care by bringing together expertise from throughout the cancer community, as well as ASTRO's mission to improve patient outcomes through research and education.

"With the number of cancer patients rising each year, collaboration across the spectrum of cancer care has to be our reality rather than our goal," said Laura Thevenot, Chief Executive Officer of ASTRO. "By combining ASTRO's domain-specific knowledge with CancerLinQ's broad reach, we can help physicians and their patients be more informed as they navigate complex treatment decisions."

As an official partnering organization of CancerLinQ, ASTRO will support professional member participation in the program, advocate for streamlined data integration between leading oncology electronic health systems, and strengthen CancerLinQ's role as a go-to resource for the healthcare community. ASTRO will have access to CancerLinQ Discovery, which generates specially curated sets of de-identified clinical data from the CancerLinQ platform for oncologists, researchers and analysts to create new clinical knowledge and improve patient outcomes. In addition, ASTRO will become a founding member of the CancerLinQ Oncology Leadership Council, a body of thought leaders and oncology-affiliated experts that advises the CancerLinQ Board of Governors.

CancerLinQ is a powerful database--created by oncologists for oncologists--made up of vast amounts of usable, searchable, real-world cancer information. This big data initiative will allow users to see trends among millions of patients by analyzing cancer patient medical records, uncovering patterns that can improve patient care, and enabling doctors to compare their care against that of their peers and recommended guidelines.

In addition to the radiation oncologists, CancerLinQ LLC--a wholly owned nonprofit subsidiary of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)--is forging important strategic alliances with national leaders and organizations that play important roles across the entire care continuum that support high-quality care for patients, including professionals representing the entirety of the care team, government agencies, academic research institutions, life sciences, technology experts and advocacy organizations.
-end-
CancerLinQ is supported in part through the Conquer Cancer Foundation, whose generous donors have helped make the system possible. Major supporters include Amgen; Astellas; AstraZeneca; Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals Inc.; Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; Cancer Treatment Centers of America; Chan Soon-Shiong Family Foundation; Genentech BioOncology; HELSINN; Janssen Oncology; Lilly; Raj Mantena, RPh; Novartis Oncology; Pfizer Oncology; Thomas G. Roberts, Jr., MD, and Susan M. DaSilva; and Susan G. Komen.

CancerLinQ and CancerLinQ Discovery are projects of CancerLinQ LLC. For more information on how to participate or partner with CancerLinQ, please visit http://CancerLinQ.org">CancerLinQ.org.

About CancerLinQ LLC

CancerLinQ LLC is a subsidiary of American Society of Clinical Oncology, Inc. established for the development and operation of the CancerLinQ initiative. CancerLinQ is a health information technology platform aimed at enhancing and improving the understanding and treatment of cancer. To learn more, visit http://www.cancerlinq.org.

ASTRO

ASTRO is the premier radiation oncology society in the world, with more than 11,000 members who are physicians, nurses, biologists, physicists, radiation therapists, dosimetrists and other health care professionals that specialize in treating patients with radiation therapies. As the leading organization in radiation oncology, the Society is dedicated to improving patient care through professional education and training, support for clinical practice and health policy standards, advancement of science and research, and advocacy. ASTRO publishes three medical journals, International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics and Practical Radiation Oncology and Advances in Radiation Oncology; developed and maintains an extensive patient website, http://www.rtanswers.org; and created the Radiation Oncology Institute, a non-profit foundation to support research and education efforts around the world that enhance and confirm the critical role of radiation therapy in improving cancer treatment. To learn more about ASTRO, visit http://www.astro.org.

About ASCO


Founded in 1964, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Inc. (ASCO) is committed to making a world of difference in cancer care. As the world's leading organization of its kind, ASCO represents more than 40,000 oncology professionals who care for people living with cancer. Through research, education, and promotion of the highest-quality patient care, ASCO works to conquer cancer and create a world where cancer is prevented or cured, and every survivor is healthy. ASCO is supported by its affiliate organization, the Conquer Cancer Foundation. Learn more at http://www.ASCO.org, explore patient education resources at http://www.Cancer.Net, and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube.

American Society for Radiation Oncology

Related Radiation Articles:

A new way to monitor cancer radiation therapy doses
More than half of all cancer patients undergo radiation therapy and the dose is critical.
Nimotuzumab-cisplatin-radiation versus cisplatin-radiation in HPV negative oropharyngeal cancer
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 4: In this study, locally advanced head and neck cancer patients undergoing definitive chemoradiation were randomly allocated to weekly cisplatin - radiation {CRT arm} or nimotuzumab -weekly cisplatin -radiation {NCRT arm}.
Breaking up amino acids with radiation
A new experimental and theoretical study published in EPJ D has shown how the ions formed when electrons collide with one amino acid, glutamine, differ according to the energy of the colliding electrons.
Radiation breaks connections in the brain
One of the potentially life-altering side effects that patients experience after cranial radiotherapy for brain cancer is cognitive impairment.
Fragmenting ions and radiation sensitizers
The anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5FU) acts as a radiosensitizer: it is rapidly taken up into the DNA of cancer cells, making the cells more sensitive to radiotherapy.
'Seeing the light' behind radiation therapy
Delivering just the right dose of radiation for cancer patients is a delicate balance in their treatment regime.
Radiation contamination at a crematorium
Radioactive compounds known as radiopharmaceuticals are used in nuclear medicine procedures to diagnose and treat disease.
First study of terahertz radiation in liquids
A research team from ITMO University and the University of Rochester (the USA) conducted a study on the formation of terahertz radiation in liquids.
A new way to create Saturn's radiation belts
A team of international scientists from BAS, University of Iowa and GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences has discovered a new method to explain how radiation belts are formed around the planet Saturn.
A better device for measuring electromagnetic radiation
Researchers have developed a better bolometer, a device for measuring electromagnetic radiation.
More Radiation News and Radiation Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.