Study finds language, achievement benefits of universal early childhood education

February 22, 2018

Chestnut Hill, Mass. (2/21/2018) - Universal child care that starts as early as age one improves language skills for young children, especially those from low-income families, according to a study of Norway's child care system by a team of researchers led by Boston College Lynch School of Education Professor Eric Dearing. Offering high-quality child care beginning at age one is reducing early achievement gaps in Norwegian communities, the team reported in a recent edition of the education research journal AERA Open.

As the ranks of children in Norway's universal child care program increase, the language skill gap between rich and poor children narrows, according to the study of more than 60,000 children. "This has very important implications for early education policy in the United States, where we are debating how early to start and whether preschool should be provided to all children or exclusively target low-income children," said Dearing, a professor of applied developmental psychology who is also a senior research fellow at the Norwegian Center for Child Behavioral Development at the University of Oslo.

The study, titled Estimating the Consequences of Norway's National Scale-Up of Early Childhood Education and Care (Beginning in Infancy) for Early Language Skills, reported findings including:

"While many state-funded preschool programs in the U.S. do not begin until age three or later, this study provides some of the first large-scale evidence that public early education for children as young as age one can be critical for children's language skills," said Dearing.
-end-
Dearing conducted the project with Norwegian scholars Henrik Daae Zachrisson of the University of Oslo and Arnstein Mykletun, of the University of Tromso and Harvard Medical School researcher Dr. Claudio O. Toppelberg.

Boston College

Related Language Skills Articles from Brightsurf:

Lego builds anaesthesia skills according to new study
Lego could be used as a practical tool to train doctors in anaesthetic skills according to new research that has shown a simple task using the building bricks can help improve technical skills - a finding that could improve medical training and patient safety.

Behavioral intervention, not lovastatin, improves language skills in youth with fragile X
A UC Davis Health study found more evidence for the efficacy of telehealth-delivered behavioral intervention in treating language problems in youth with fragile X syndrome.

Associations between screen use, language skills
Researchers combined the results of 42 studies in this analysis to examine associations between the quantity, quality and onset of screen use by children and language skills.

How language proficiency correlates with cognitive skills
An international team of researchers carried out an experiment at HSE University demonstrating that knowledge of several languages can improve the performance of the human brain.

Sleep linked to language skills in neurodevelopmental disorders
New research has discovered that Down's syndrome, Fragile X syndrome and Williams syndrome are all linked to sleep disruption in very young children, and that sleep plays a crucial role in the development of these children's language skills.

How coworkers impact the value of your skills
New research by Harvard's Growth Lab uncovers the importance of teams and coworkers in shaping productivity, earning potential, and stays of employment.

New research quantifies how much speakers' first language affects learning a new language
Linguistic research suggests that accents are strongly shaped by the speaker's first language they learned growing up.

Children's language skills may be harmed by social hardship
Children from disadvantaged backgrounds are three times more likely to develop difficulties with language than those from more affluent areas, research suggests.

Poor motor skills predict long-term language impairments for children with autism
Fine motor skills - used for eating, writing and buttoning clothing - may be a strong predictor for identifying whether children with autism are at risk for long-term language disabilities, according to a Rutgers-led study.

Study finds dramatic differences in tests assessing preschoolers' language skills
Researchers examined the impact of preterm birth on language outcomes in preschoolers born preterm and full-term, using both standardized assessment and language sample analysis.

Read More: Language Skills News and Language Skills Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.