Researchers have identified a novel immunological mechanism of great importance for vaccine developm

February 23, 2014

Researchers have discovered the presence of a novel subtype of innate lymphoid cells in human spleen essential for the production of antibodies. This discovery, published in the prestigious journal Nature Immunology, clears the path to the identification of novel strategies to develop more efficient vaccines against encapsulated bacteria, considered highly virulent.

This work was done by the B cell Biology research group at IMIM (Institut Hospital del Mar d'Investigacions Mediques) in Barcelona, directed by Dr. Andrea Cerutti, ICREA research professor and leader in the field of B lymphocyte biology. Amongst the collaborators of the group are researchers from Icahn School of Medicine of Mount Sinai in New York and Riken Research Center for Integrative Medicine in Japan.

Innate lymphoid cells were recently described by the scientific community and represent the first line of immunological defence on our body surfaces, which are constantly exposed to bacteria, such as the intestine or skin. "For the first time it has been described both their presence and function in human spleen. We have discovered how these cells regulate the innate immune response of a subset of splenic B lymphocytes that are responsible to fight against encapsulated bacteria, causative agents of meningitis or pneumonia", says Dr. Giuliana Magri, member of the research group of B Cell Biology at IMIM and first author in the paper. This new finding improves our understanding on how the immune system protects us against infections.

"The current available vaccines against encapsulated bacteria confer only a limited protection in immunodeficient patients, and are too expensive to be implemented in developing countries. At the same time, we lack information on the underlying mechanisms that regulate B lymphocytes, which has been a major hurdle in the development of novel vaccine strategies. This makes the current discovery key in the design of novel more efficient and well-oriented therapies", concludes Dr. Andrea Cerutti.

This research involved in vitro studies with isolated cells from human spleen samples and in vivo studies performed with different mice models. The work explored the function of the innate lymphoid cells in homeostasis, in short, in the absence of any illness, opening the door in the future to study the possible implication of innate lymphoid cells in diverse pathological processes both at the mucosal and systemic level, as well as deepening our understanding of autoimmune and immunodeficient diseases.
-end-
Reference Article:

Innate lymphoid cells integrate stromal and immune signals to enhance antibody production by splenic marginal zone B cells. Giuliana Magri, Michio Miyajima, Sabrina Bascones, Arthur Mortha, Irene Puga, Linda Cassis, Carolina M. Barra, Laura Comerma, Aleksey Chudnovskiy, Maurizio Gentile, David Llige, Montserrat Cols, Sergi Serrano, Juan Ignacio Arostegui, Manuel Juan, Jordi Yague, Miriam Merad, Sidonia Fagarasan & Andrea Cerutti. Nature Immunology. DOI: 10.1038/ni.2830.

IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute)

Related Bacteria Articles from Brightsurf:

Siblings can also differ from one another in bacteria
A research team from the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) is investigating how pathogens influence the immune response of their host with genetic variation.

How bacteria fertilize soya
Soya and clover have their very own fertiliser factories in their roots, where bacteria manufacture ammonium, which is crucial for plant growth.

Bacteria might help other bacteria to tolerate antibiotics better
A new paper by the Dynamical Systems Biology lab at UPF shows that the response by bacteria to antibiotics may depend on other species of bacteria they live with, in such a way that some bacteria may make others more tolerant to antibiotics.

Two-faced bacteria
The gut microbiome, which is a collection of numerous beneficial bacteria species, is key to our overall well-being and good health.

Microcensus in bacteria
Bacillus subtilis can determine proportions of different groups within a mixed population.

Right beneath the skin we all have the same bacteria
In the dermis skin layer, the same bacteria are found across age and gender.

Bacteria must be 'stressed out' to divide
Bacterial cell division is controlled by both enzymatic activity and mechanical forces, which work together to control its timing and location, a new study from EPFL finds.

How bees live with bacteria
More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone.

The bacteria building your baby
Australian researchers have laid to rest a longstanding controversy: is the womb sterile?

Hopping bacteria
Scientists have long known that key models of bacterial movement in real-world conditions are flawed.

Read More: Bacteria News and Bacteria Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.