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AAAS and March for Science partner to uphold science

February 23, 2017

AAAS, the world's largest general scientific organization, announced Thursday that it will partner with the March for Science, a nonpartisan set of activities that aim to promote science education and the use of scientific evidence to inform policy.

The March for Science has released a list of more than 25 initial partner organizations, including AAAS, and suggestions for science engagement activities at hundreds of locations throughout the United States and around the world to coincide with the previously announced March for Science rally in Washington, DC, scheduled for 22 April. The activities may include "teach-ins," science events, open houses and rallies.

AAAS CEO Rush Holt said, "AAAS will encourage and support its members and affiliate organizations to help make the March for Science a success. We see the activities collectively known as the March as a unique opportunity to communicate the importance, value and beauty of science. Participation in the March for Science is in keeping with AAAS' long-standing mission to 'advance science, engineering, and innovation throughout the world for the benefit of all people.'"

AAAS' support for the March for Science is based on shared recognition that scientists and engineers offer the public an open pathway to discovery that has deepened human understanding of the world and advanced innovations that have delivered significant economic benefits.

Both groups adhere to the understanding that it is necessary to protect the rights of scientists to pursue and communicate their inquiries unimpeded, expand the placement of scientists throughout the government, build public policies upon scientific evidence, and support broad educational efforts to expand public understanding of the scientific process.

"There is a great deal of energy associated with the March for Science, and I believe it's important that organizers and the science-loving public who participate in related events around the world ensure they are positive, non-partisan, educational and diverse," said Holt.
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The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is the world's largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science as well as Science Translational Medicine, Science Signaling, a digital, open-access journal, Science Advances, Science Immunology, and Science Robotics. AAAS was founded in 1848 and includes nearly 250 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals. Science has the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world. The nonprofit AAAS is open to all and fulfills its mission to "advance science and serve society" through initiatives in science policy, international programs, science education, public engagement, and more. For additional information about AAAS, see http://www.aaas.org.

American Association for the Advancement of Science

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