Nav: Home

Researchers ponder the shape of birds' eggs

February 23, 2017

The shape of birds' eggs varies considerably, for reasons that are unclear. The peculiarly elongated and pointed shape of the Common Guillemot's egg is thought to prevent it from rolling off the narrow cliff ledge it is laid on, but new research suggests instead that the shape has more to do with providing resistance against impacts and protection from faecal and other contamination.

"I have studied guillemots for over forty years and have never been convinced by the rolling explanation. It has been exciting coming up with new ideas and testing them," said Dr. Tim Birkhead, lead author of the Ibis study.
-end-


Wiley

Related Convinced Articles:

Studies find link between belief in conspiracy theories and political engagement
A belief in the existence of conspiracies seems to go hand-in-hand with the assumption that political violence is an acceptable option
Producing human tissue in space
The University of Zurich has sent adult human stem cells to the International Space Station (ISS).
Molecular motors -- Rotation on an eight-shaped path
Chemical engineers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich, Germany, have developed the first molecular motor that enables an eight-shaped movement.
Decrease in greenhouse gas emissions linked to Soviet Union's collapse
As the authors posit, the collapse of the Soviet Union led to decreasing meat product consumption, abandonment of cultivated land, and restructuring of food sales chains; which, in turn, elicited a decrease in greenhouse gas emissions.
Predictors of refugee adjustment: The importance of cognitive skills and personality
An increased willingness to take risks, reciprocating friendliness, and a conviction that they are in control of their own lives lead to refugees gaining a foothold in Germany faster.
Medical scanner helps to unlock the mysteries of a giant prehistoric marine reptile
A nearly meter-long skull of a giant fossil marine ichthyosaur found in a farmer's field more than 60 years ago has been studied for the first time.
Boosting gravitational wave detectors with quantum tricks
A group of scientists from the Niels Bohr Institute (NBI) at the University of Copenhagen will soon start developing a new line of technical equipment in order to dramatically improve gravitational wave detectors.
'Believing you're a winner' gives men a testosterone boost and promiscuous disposition
New findings suggest that the male body tries to 'optimize' self-perceived improvements in social status through hormonal shifts that promote 'short-term mating.'
Kesterite solar cells: Germanium promises better opto-electronic properties than tin
Specific changes in the composition of kesterite-type semiconductors make it possible to improve their suitability as absorber layers in solar cells.
Map of ionospheric disturbances to help improve radio network systems
The paper, titled
More Convinced News and Convinced Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.