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Screening for fracture risk in postmenopausal women is cost-effective

February 23, 2018

A recent Journal of Bone and Mineral Research analysis indicates that screening for fracture risk in older postmenopausal women is a good use of healthcare resources -- in other words, it's cost-effective.

The analysis examined results from a large randomized controlled trial. Screening, using the FRAX fracture risk calculator in addition to bone density measurements, was highly cost-effective when compared with usual management, with savings due to prevention of all osteoporosis-related fractures and hip fractures.

"This cost-effectiveness study was conducted within a trial of screening to prevent osteoporotic fractures in elderly women. This very large clinical trial, in over 12,000 participants, provided a unique opportunity to investigate the cost-effectiveness of screening using information collected from a single large cohort," said lead author David Turner, of the University of East Anglia, in the UK. "This showed screening to be cost-effective and to represent an important resource for healthcare decision-making, both in the UK and internationally."
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Wiley

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