Growing danger from post-birth bleeding

February 24, 2009

Post-partum haemorrhage (PPH) immediately after giving birth is the largest threat to new mothers in high-income countries. An Australian study, featured in the open access journal BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, shows that an increasing number of women suffered severe problems arising from blood loss after delivery.

Christine Roberts from the University of Sydney and Royal North Shore Hospital led a team of researchers who studied the birth-hospital discharge records of the 500,603 women who had children in New South Wales during the study period. She said, "We identified 6242 women who suffered severe adverse outcomes, including 22 who died in hospital. Of the 6242, 67% had an obstetric haemorrhage (60% PPH)".

The consequences of adverse maternal outcomes can include infertility, psychological effects, disability and even death. According to Roberts, "Active management of the third stage of labour, delivery of the placenta, is effective in reducing PPH. Unfortunately, adherence to active third-stage management recommendations is poorly reported and/or suboptimal in Australia, and significant variations in policies and practice have been reported in Europe. Suboptimal adherence to active management guidelines could explain the rising PPH rates".

The authors found that between 1999 and 2004 the annual rate of adverse maternal outcomes increased by 20.9%. This increase occurred almost entirely among women who had a PPH. Although adverse outcomes also increased among women with conditions related to high blood pressure, over half these women also had a PPH. Roberts said, "Women with risk factors for PPH, such as a very low placenta or a previous PPH, should give birth in hospitals with facilities to manage severe haemorrhage."

The authors conclude, "We feel that all women should have access to active management of the third stage of labour and careful observation in the first two hours after delivery, as this may reduce the PPH rate and the potential for severe harm and death".
-end-
Notes to Editors:

1. Trends in adverse maternal outcomes during childbirth: a population-based study of severe maternal morbidity
Christine L Roberts, Jane B Ford, Charles S Algert, Jane C Bell, Judy M Simpson and Jonathan M Morris
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth (in press)

During embargo, article available here: http://www.biomedcentral.com/imedia/1714700368226262_article.pdf?random=592164

After the embargo, article available at the journal website: http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpregnancychildbirth/

Please name the journal in any story you write. If you are writing for the web, please link to the article. All articles are available free of charge, according to BioMed Central's open access policy.

Article citation and URL available on request at press@biomedcentral.com on the day of publication.

2. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth is an open access journal publishing original peer-reviewed research articles in all aspects of pregnancy and childbirth. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth (ISSN 1471-2393) is indexed/tracked/covered by PubMed, MEDLINE, CAS, Scopus, EMBASE and Google Scholar.

3. BioMed Central (http://www.biomedcentral.com/) is an STM (Science, Technology and Medicine) publisher which has pioneered the open access publishing model. All peer-reviewed research articles published by BioMed Central are made immediately and freely accessible online, and are licensed to allow redistribution and reuse. BioMed Central is part of Springer Science+Business Media, a leading global publisher in the STM sector.

BioMed Central

Related Death Articles from Brightsurf:

Recommendations to improve consensus of determining brain death, death by neurologic criteria
International professional societies developed recommendations for minimum clinical standards to determine brain death/death by neurologic criteria in adults and children to improve the consistency of these criteria within and among countries.

Silicones may lead to cell death
Silicone molecules from breast implants can initiate processes in human cells that lead to cell death.

Sleep, death and ... the gut?
A new study finds a causal link between sleep deprivation and death.

Risk of death from stroke falls by 24%
Thousands more patients each year are surviving strokes, as the risk of death and disability after a stroke fell significantly between 2000 and 2015, according to analysis by Guy's and St Thomas' researchers.

Cells control their dance of death
La Trobe University researchers have revealed for the first time how white blood cells control the final moments of their death, helping their own removal from the human body.

Predicting frailty, disability and death
In a study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, researchers analyzed patterns of movement among elderly study participants and found that irregular, spontaneous fluctuations could predict a person's risk of frailty, disability and death years later.

One in 10 people have 'near-death' experiences, according to new study
The new findings were presented at the 5th European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Congress.

Jobs vs. death toll: Calculating corporate death penalties
What misdeeds warrant corporate death penalties? A new study explores two case studies focused on industries that kill more people than they employ.

New role for death molecule
To unravel programmed cell death pathways, investigators examine a molecule deemed unimportant, and find new function.

Death near the shoreline, not life on land
Our understanding of when the very first animals started living on land is helped by identifying trace fossils--the tracks and trails left by ancient animals--in sedimentary rocks that were deposited on the continents.

Read More: Death News and Death Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.